How can I get bird banding and encounter data from the Bird Banding Laboratory?

Banding and encounter data are available for research purposes. Individual banding data records exist electronically starting in 1960. Pre-1960 banding data are available only for birds that have been encountered. Individual encounter data are available from 1913. To make a data request go to the Banding and Encounter Data page.

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What functions are available in the Bander Portal for bird banders?

Use the Bander Portal to:

  • View and update your contact information,
  • List subpermittees, band inventory, and locations associated with your permit,
  • Order bands and confirm bands as received,
  • Request
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How do I submit bird banding and/or bird recapture data?

Bird banding and band recapture data from banding activities must be submitted to the Bird Banding Laboratory using Bandit, The Information Manager for Banding Operations. Bandit is desktop

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I have a federal permit to band birds. How do I order bands?

If you already have a federal permit or sub permit to band birds, sign in to the Bander Portal to order bands and/or confirm bands as received.

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How do I renew or modify my existing federal bird banding permit?

To renew or make changes to existing bird banding permits, use the links below:

●      Request a sub-permit

●      Change in the

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How do I obtain a federal bird banding permit?

A Federal Bird Banding and Marking Permit is required whenever someone wants to place a bird band or any type of marker on a wild bird that is protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act or on a federally-protected bird that will be released into the wild. To obtain a permit, visit the

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What are the ethics and responsibilities of Bird Banders?

Bird banding has long been recognized as an important research tool that has substantially improved our understanding of many aspects of avian biology and provided critical information for the management and conservation of bird populations. It is normally safe when proper techniques and equipment are carefully employed by

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Does banding hurt birds?

No, banding does not hurt birds. When proper techniques and equipment are carefully employed, it’s a safe procedure for birds. Trained banders, who apply their expertise and thoughtfulness towards the health and well-being of the birds, follow strict procedures based on the

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How do I get a certificate of appreciation after reporting a banded bird?

Certificates of appreciation are given to people who have found birds with leg bands or color markers and reported them to the Bird Banding Laboratory through www.reportband.gov. Certificates are automatically generated when you report a bird and can be downloaded immediately after

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I found (or killed) a bird with a band or color marker around its leg. What do I do?

Bird band information is an important tool that is used to monitor populations, set hunting regulations, restore endangered species, study effects of environmental contaminants, and address such issues as Avian Influenza, bird hazards at airports, and crop depredations.

The North American Bird Banding Program is

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Who can band birds?

Because banding birds requires capturing the birds and handling them before the banding takes place, the banding of birds in the United States is controlled under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and requires a federal banding permit. Some states require a state

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Filter Total Items: 10
banding waterfowl
July 26, 2017

The captured waterfowl are gently banded with a unique number that can be read if and when it is captured again. 

Banding a Least Common Tern Chick
August 25, 2016

A member of the field crew holds a recently banded least tern chick, displaying both its metal permanent band and its plastic field readable band.

A whooping crane mother and her two chicks in Louisiana, 2016
April 13, 2016

Female whooping crane L6-12 and chicks LW1-16 and LW2-16, April 13, 2016. These are the first wild-hatched whooper chicks in Louisiana since 1939. Their parents, a four-year-old female and a three-year-old male, were raised at USGS’ Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland, where researchers work to rebuild free-flying populations of the bugle-voiced, endangered birds

A little red bird being handled by scientist
2015 (approx.)

Adult Iiwi being banded at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawaii

Flying, banded Greater White-fronted geese in northern Alaska
June 21, 2013

Banded Greater White-fronted geese flying in northern Alaska.

Screen shot of number of birds banded
November 30, 2000
Osprey with bird bands in nest
January 1, 0000

Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, with bird bands in nest with mate

Location and abundance of ducks captured and banded in Suisun Marsh

Location and abundance of ducks captured and banded in Suisun Marsh during the late summer (May-September), and recovered (N=9,368) since 1932 in North America. The main map shows recovered mallards (orange) in the western U.S., and the inset map shows recovered mallard (orange; N=8,367), northern pintail (green; N=670), gadwall (blue; N=246), and cinnamon teal (yellow; N=85) in North America. Ducks were banded within the Suisun Marsh by the California Department of Fish and Game and California Waterfowl Association, and band recoveries were thereafter managed by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Bird Banding Lab.

Figure from Ackerman, JT, MP Herzog, GS Yarris, ML Casazza, E Burns, and JM Eadie. 2014. Chapter 5: Waterfowl ecology and management. Pages 103-132 and maps 10 and 11 in Moyle, PB, A Manfree, and PL Fiedler (editors): Suisun Marsh: Ecological History and Possible Futures. University of California Press: Berkeley, California. 239 pages. 

USGS

Bandit is the latest in a series of desktop applications aimed at helping bird banders manage and submit their data for banded birds. We have tried to make the process of maintaining banding records as simple as possible. Bandit was created by the Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD.

Photo of Bird Bands in a Variety of Sizes and Types

Photo of Bird Bands in a Variety of Sizes and Types