Mission Areas

Ecosystems

The USGS Ecosystems Mission Area, the biological research arm of the Department of the Interior (DOI), provides science to help America achieve sustainable management and conservation of its biological resources. This work is done within the broader mission of the USGS to serve the Nation with science that advances understanding of our natural resources and inform land and water stewardship.

Collaborative Conservation

Collaborative Conservation

What do gray wolves, manatees and bears have in common? They are just a few of the species that are part of important USGS research that informs U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decisions for endangered and threatened species.

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Outstanding in the Field

Outstanding in the Field

An Ecosystems Mission Area original podcast series that tells stories about our science, our adventures, and our efforts to better understand fish and wildlife and the ecosystems that support them.  

Ep 4 - Frog Calls

Where's our Science?

Where

Find out where Ecosystems Science Centers, Field Stations, and Cooperative Research Units are located.

Browse by Location

News

Date published: September 13, 2019

Fast Fire Facts from USGS

 

You’ve got questions about USGS fire science. We’ve got answers.

Date published: September 9, 2019

New Center Director at the Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center

CORVALLIS, Ore. — The U.S. Geological Survey has selected Sue Phillips as the new center director of the Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center. FRESC is headquartered in Corvallis, Oregon, with research offices in Corvallis; Boise, Idaho; Seattle, Washington; and Olympic National Park in Port Angeles, Washington.

Date published: August 14, 2019

Rising Sea Levels Could Accelerate Florida Bay Mangrove Loss

USGS scientists look to the past to learn about the future of Florida mangroves

Publications

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Year Published: 2019

Catalog of microscopic organisms of the Everglades, part 2—The desmids of the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

The Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (refuge), Boynton Beach, Florida, contains approximately 147,000 acres southeast of Lake Okeechobee. Water quality in the interior portion of the refuge is strongly influenced by rainfall, resulting in slightly acidic waters with low dissolved ions. Desmids, a unique, ornate group of...

Rosen, Barry H.; Stahlhut, Katherine N.; Hall, John D.
Rosen, B.H., Stahlhut, K.N., and Hall, J.D., 2019, Catalog of microscopic organisms of the Everglades, part 2—The desmids of the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2019–5074, 277 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20195074.

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Year Published: 2019

Research Note: How old are the people who die in avalanches? A look into the ages of avalanche victims in the United States (1950-2018)

Since the winter of 1950-1951, 1084 individuals perished in snow avalanches in the United States. In this study, we analyze the ages of those killed (n=900) by applying non-parametric methods to annual median ages and for age groups and primary activity groups. Change point detection results suggest a significant change in 1990 in the median age...

Peitzsch, Erich; Boilen, Sara; Birkeland, Karl W.; Logan, Spencer

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Year Published: 2019

Sampling across 20 years (1996–2017) reveals loss of diversity and genetic connectivity in the Coachella Valley fringe-toed lizard (Uma inornata)

The Coachella Valley fringe-toed lizard (Uma inornata) is a federally threatened, aeolian sand dune obligate, endemic to the Coachella Valley, California. Historically, U. inornata is thought to have formed a large interconnected metapopulation across the valley, with local dune habitat and population size fluctuations linked to...

Vandergast, Amy G.; Wood, Dustin A.; Fisher, Mark; Barrows, Cameron W.; Mitelberg, Anna; Smith, Julia G.
Vandergast, A.G., Wood, D.A., Fisher, M., Barrows, C., Mitelberg, A., and Smith, J.G., 2019, Sampling across 20 years (1996–2017) reveals loss of diversity and genetic connectivity in the Coachella Valley fringe-toed lizard (Uma inornata): U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2019–1105, 20 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20191105.