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Latest Newsletter

Latest Newsletter

In this issue: 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake geo-narrative, potential landslide in Alaska, subduction zone science, post-wildfire debris flow assessments, new @USGS_Quakes Twitter account, mapping faults in Puerto Rico, and more.

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Date published: May 21, 2021

Magnitude 6.1 and 7.3 Earthquakes in China

A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck south-central China near Dali on May 21, 2021 at 9:48 pm local time (May 21 at 13:48 UTC) followed by a magnitude 7.3 on May 22 at 2:04 am local time (May 21 at 18:04 UTC). Seismic instruments indicate both earthquakes originated at a depth of 6.2 miles (10 kilometers).

Date published: May 14, 2021

Hurricane Preparedness Week

The 2021 National Hurricane Preparedness Week is May 9th to May 15th, a week dedicated to sharing knowledge about hurricane hazards that can be used to prepare and take action!    

 

Date published: May 12, 2021

USGS Scientists Add Another Piece to Puzzle of How Hurricanes Can Gain Strength

Unique observations collected by U.S. Geological Survey scientists during Hurricane María in 2017, revealed previously unknown ocean processes that may aid in more accurate hurricane forecasting and impact predictions.

Date published: May 12, 2021

Christina Neal to Lead USGS Volcano Science Center

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — On May 9, 2021, Christina (Tina) Neal became the new director of the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Science Center, home of the Alaska, California, Cascades, Hawaiian and Yellowstone volcano observatories.  

Date published: May 4, 2021

Entire U.S. West Coast Now Has Access to ShakeAlert® Earthquake Early Warning

After 15 years of planning and development, the ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system is now available to more than 50 million people in California, Oregon and Washington, the most earthquake-prone region in the conterminous U.S.

Date published: April 13, 2021

Women of Hazards Featured During Women’s History Month on @USGS_Quakes Instagram

For Women’s History Month in March 2021 the @USGS_Quakes Instagram featured dozens of photos of female earthquake scientists and shout-outs with the hashtag #EarthquakeWomen from the Earthquake Science Center, Geologic Hazards Science Center and the Office of Communications and Publishing (OCAP).

Date published: April 8, 2021

USGS Seeks Earthquake Hazards Research Proposals

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently soliciting project proposals for Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 grants on earthquake hazards science and is authorized to award up to $7 million. The deadline for applications is June 1, 2021, and interested researchers can apply online at GRANTS.GOV under funding Opportunity Number G22AS00006. 

Date published: April 6, 2021

New electron microprobe installed at Menlo Park

On March 25th, the USGS California Volcano Observatory celebrated the delivery of a new 'baby' - our brand new electron microprobe is finally up and running!

March 31, 2021

Sound Waves Newsletter - December 2020-March 2021

Read about the challenges of conducting research during a pandemic, how USGS scientists conducted a nationwide assessment of salt marsh vulnerability, and more, in this December 2020-March 2021 issue of Sound Waves.

Date published: March 31, 2021

Overcoming research challenges amid the COVID-19 pandemic

The USGS Mendenhall Research Fellowship Program is a prestigious opportunity for early career geoscientists to enhance their scientific stature and credentials. The fellowships are limited to a two-year appointment, making them time-sensitive by nature. While this is typically adequate time to complete their research, a global pandemic has posed new challenges for Mendenhall fellows at USGS....

Date published: March 31, 2021

Providing Guidance and Hope for Coral Restoration Efforts

Coral reefs are suffering due to multiple stressors in our changing world, but there is hope for recovery. New USGS science can help guide the way to restoration success.