Southwest Biological Science Center

Fish and Wildlife

Filter Total Items: 29
Date published: May 28, 2021
Status: Active

Bug Flows: Improving Food Web Health by Giving Bugs the Weekends Off

Native and desired nonnative fish downstream of Glen Canyon Dam are food limited—meaning that if more or larger invertebrate food items were available, there would be more and larger fish. Aquatic insects have complex life cycles that include egg, larvae, and pupal stages that are aquatic while adults have wings and are typically terrestrial. Aquatic insects are a fundamental component of...

Date published: March 10, 2021
Status: Active

Is timing really everything? Evaluating Resource Response to Spring Disturbance Flows

Glen Canyon Dam has altered ecological processes of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Before the dam was built, the Colorado River experienced seasonable variable flow rates, including springtime flooding events. These spring floods scoured the river bottom and enhanced natural processes that sustained the Colorado River ecosystem. Since the dam’s construction in 1963, springtime floods have...

Date published: June 11, 2019
Status: Active

GCMRC Online Maps

The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center maintains an enterprise GIS platform built upon ESRI ArcGIS Server and Portal applications.  This enterprise system allows for spatial data, maps and analytical tools to be served through online applications.  The Geospatial Science and Technology project provides access to this content through different avenues.  Online maps can be accessed...

Date published: June 11, 2019
Status: Active

GCMRC Data Applications

The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center develops and collaborates with other science centers to create online data applications that provide access to project data as it becomes available to the public.  Some of these applications provide data in near real-time, while other project data are updated at some regular interval (annually, quarterly).  

Content listed here include...

Date published: June 11, 2019
Status: Active

GCMRC Data Releases

Data releases made available by GCMRC can be found here as they are published via the USGS Fundamental Science Practices (FSPs).  Individual science product links will take users to the USGS ScienceBase website for each entry.

 

Click on Data and Tools Tab to see list of Data Releases.

Date published: April 24, 2019
Status: Active

Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Projects

The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center currently functions under a Triennial Work Plan (TWP) which is thoroughly reviewed and vetted both internally within the Center and through the GCDAMP Technical Work Group (TWG) and the Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG).  These advisory panels have been a part of the Glen Canyon Dam...

Date published: December 21, 2017
Status: Active

Mountain Lions of the Intermountain West

The presence of top predators is considered an indication of ecosystem health and can play a vital role in ecosystem functioning by promoting biodiversity, and can contribute to regulating prey species abundance, and herbivory.  In the intermountain west, the largest mammalian predator and obligate carnivore is the mountain lion, Puma concolor.  This elusive and wide-ranging predator...

Date published: May 14, 2017
Status: Active

Rainbow Trout Abundance and Movement in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

Just below Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River is a very popular Blue Ribbon trout fishery known for its rainbow trout. However, approximately 78 miles downstream, near were the Little Colorado River flows into the Colorado River, is a population of endangered humpback chub. The introduced rainbow trout can negatively affect native humpback chub by competing with them for food (immature...

Contacts: Charles Yackulic, Josh Korman
Date published: February 14, 2017
Status: Active

Informing Renewable Energy Development Siting Decisions with Vertebrate Biodiversity Measures

Renewable energy development is expanding in southwestern deserts, including in Arizona. Energy developers look to resource management agencies to provide siting guidance on public lands where there might be conflicts with wildlife. Often, agency guidance considers species of conservation concern and economic importance, but information on comprehensive vertebrate biodiversity has been hard to...

Date published: February 9, 2017
Status: Active

Invertebrate Drift Downstream of Colorado River Basin Dams

Aquatic invertebrates are critical food for fish and other species that inhabit large rivers. In the Colorado River Basin, invertebrates that get transported down the river (“in the drift”) are particularly important to rainbow trout and other species of interest to recreational users. This research seeks to compare rivers downstream of large dams throughout the Colorado River Basin in order...

Date published: January 18, 2017
Status: Active

Uncovering the Base of the Food Web: Primary Production Dynamics in the Colorado River

Algae, phytoplankton, and rooted macrophytes represent the base of many aquatic food webs and are known as primary producers. Through photosynthesis, these organisms convert sunlight energy into chemical energy (i.e., carbon) that in turn fuels the growth of animals such as macroinvertebrates and fish. This project uses high frequency measurements of dissolved oxygen, which is a by-product of...

Date published: December 23, 2016
Status: Active

Population Dynamics of Endangered Humpback Chub in Grand Canyon

The federally endangered humpback chub is a native fish of the Colorado River. Despite the environmental changes to the river following the construction of Glen Canyon Dam, humpback chub persists alongside nonnative species, including rainbow trout.  The pre-dam Colorado River experienced seasonal variation in temperature and discharge. Seasonal flooding resulted in sediments carried...