Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

Invasive Species

US Department of the Interior Invasive Species Blog:

Invasive Species: Finding solutions to stop their spread.

Filter Total Items: 43
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Evaluating the behavioral response of silver and bighead carp to CO2 across three temperatures

Carbon dioxide (CO2) has shown promise as a deterrent to silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead carp (H. nobilis) movement during laboratory (Kates et al. 2012, Dennis et al. 2015) and pond testing (Donaldson et al. 2016, Cupp et al. in journal review). To further understand the utility of CO2 to limit the dispersal of bigheaded carps, continued research into this technology is...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Determination of the Acute Toxicity of Model-based Candidate Chemical Toxicants to Native and Nonnative Fish Species in Static Exposures

Invasive fishes are of considerable concern to aquatic resource managers.   For example, the common carp (Cyprinus carpio), originally brought over from Eurasia sometime in the 1800s are now ubiquitous in U.S. waters.  Although they have been around for over 100 years and have become part of U.S. culture, they are still highly detrimental to aquatic ecosystems and a method to eradicate and...

Contacts: Joel G Putnam
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Carbon dioxide (CO2) injected under-ice to enhance winterkill of invasive carps

Invasive carps, primarily silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitirx), bighead carp (H. nobilis), and grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), have caused considerable ecological and economic damage in the United States. Resource managers need tools to control populations and limit range expansion of these undesired fish. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one approach...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Developing a portable LAMP assay for detecting grass and black carp

Aquatic invasive species are a significant problem throughout the world. They cause millions of dollars in damages to industry, devastate natural ecosystems, and ruin outdoor recreational areas. Preventing their spread is imperative to preserving our natural resources. One potential pathway invasive fishes can spread is by harvesting and transporting baitfish. Often shipments of baitfish are...

Contacts: Chris M Merkes
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Correlating seasonal trends and occupancy of bigheaded carp eDNA to land use and stream characteristics

The results of this study will advance our understanding of environmental DNA (eDNA) and how eDNA signatures change as fish behavior changes over the course of the open water season.  This will further develop eDNA as an easy sampling method to collect information about invading populations or cryptic species that are difficult to capture so that resource managers can be given better...

Date published: May 8, 2017
Status: Active

Bioacoustic manipulation of invasive Bigheaded carp

Bigheaded carp, especially silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), are invasive fish species that have established breeding populations dominating large regions of the Mississippi Drainage in the 20 years following escape from aquaculture facilities in Arkansas 

Date published: May 8, 2017
Status: Active

Assessment of carbon dioxide as barrier to Bigheaded carp

Currently, prevention of the movement of bigheaded carps from the Mississippi watershed into the Great Lakes rests on a single electric barrier located in the Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS).  Additional barriers and/or supplements to the electric barrier would improve the efficacy of deterring bigheaded carps movement into the Great Lakes through redundancy and ‘safety nets’, and offer...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp