Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

Invasive Species

US Department of the Interior Invasive Species Blog:

Invasive Species: Finding solutions to stop their spread.

Filter Total Items: 43
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Develop Experimental Use Permits, Datasets and Develop Registration Plans for Sea Lamprey Pheromones in Compliance with United States and Canadian Biopesticide Regulations

The result of this technical assistance is critical to developing a lamprey pheromone as a tool to control lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. If lamprey populations are left uncontrolled, the effects lamprey would have on the fishery industry in the Great Lakes would be devastating.

Contacts: Kim Fredricks
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Residue Levels of the Lampricides TFM and Niclosamide in Moribund Sea Lamprey Larvae Following Exposures to TFM and a TFM/1% Niclosamide Combination

Concerns regarding the exposure of wildlife to TFM and niclosamide that would result from the consumption of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvae exposed to these chemicals has prompted a need to investigate uptake of these chemicals in larval lampreys. A study to address concerns regarding the exposure of the endangered common term during the treatment of the St. Marys River was completed...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) density estimates using environmental DNA surveillance

Sea lampreys are a species that invaded the Great Lakes presumably following the improvements made to the Welland Canal in 1920. First reported in Lake Erie in 1921, sea lampreys subsequently spread rapidly to the upper Great Lakes and had an established spawning population in all of the upper Great Lakes by 1947 (Applegate 1950). Following their introduction, sea lamprey devastated the...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Forensic Markers of Lampricide Toxicity & Mortality in Non-Target Fishes

The pesticides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol  (TFM) and niclosamide selectively target larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) because they have a much lower capacity to detoxify these lampricides by forming glucuronide conjugates compared to typical non-target fishes. Glucuronidation makes lampricides more water soluble and easier to excrete (Lech and Statham 1975; Kane et al. 1994)....

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Evaluation of lampricide residues in mayflies during and after a TFM:1% niclosamide treatment as a risk assessment to the federally endangered pipng plover (Charadrius melodus)

The lampricides 3-Trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2’,5-dichloro-4’-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) have been used successfully more than 30 years to kill sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvae in streams and rivers tributary to the Great Lakes. TFM is sold under the commercial name Lamprecid®, a formulation of the sodium salt of TFM which is approximately 35% active ingredient by...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Archived

Use of electrified fields to control dreissenid mussels

Zebra and quagga mussels were first introduced into the Great Lakes in the 1980’s and they have since expanded to over 750 inland lakes in addition to the 5 Great Lakes (http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/Nonindigenous_Species/Zebra_mussel_distributi..., accessed 8/5/2015). A 2009...

Contacts: James Luoma
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Dissipation of Niclosamide Downstream from Granular Bayer Application Plots in Lotic Environments

Niclosamide (2-amino ethanol salt of 5-chloro-N-[2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl]-2-hydroxybenzamide, NIC) is the active ingredient in the lampricide Bayluscide®. Bayluscide® 70% wettable powder is typically used in combination with TFM to reduce the amount of TFM required for an effective treatment.  The 3.2% granular formulation of Bayluscide® is normally used alone to assess larval sea lamprey (...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Temperature-dependent toxicity of molluscicides to zebra mussels

Zebra mussels (Dreissenia polymorpha) are native to the Black, Caspian, and Aral Seas of eastern Europe (Gollasch and Leppäkoski 1999) and they were likely introduced into Lake Erie as veliger larvae in the summer or fall of 1985 (Hebert et al. 1989). Their high reproductive capacity and planktonic larval stage enable zebra mussels to rapidly disperse (Birnbaum 2011). Less than 10 years after...

Contacts: James Luoma
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Exposure-Related Effects of Zequanox on Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) Survival and Condition

A dead-cell, spray-dried powder formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A was recently approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for control of dreissenid mussels (zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussel, Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) in open-water environments.  The EPA approved product, Zequanox® (registration number 84059-15) is manufactured by...

Contacts: James Luoma
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Evaluation of lethal and sublethal responses of dreissenid and unionid mussels to elevated carbon dioxide

Control technology for dreissenid mussels currently relies heavily on chemical molluscicides that can be both costly and ecologically harmful. There is a need to develop more environmentally neutral control tools to manage dreissenid mussels. Carbon dioxide has shown toxicity to several species of invasive bivalves, including zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and the Asian clam (Corbicula...

Contacts: Diane Waller
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

The Lethality of Hot Water and Ozone on Aquatic Invasive Species

With the increasing prevalence of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) in the Chicago Area Waterways System (CAWS), the implementation of new control techniques to inhibit the dispersal of AIS is strongly desired. For a technique to be a truly viable option, the process would inhibit the movement of AIS between the Mississippi River Basin and the Great Lakes. A physical barrier separating these...

Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Use of antimycin-microparticles and corn feed to control Common Carp Cyprinus carpio

Attempts to control carp, Cyprinus carpio, populations in Minnesota (and elsewhere) date back to early 1900s (Moyle et al. 1950, Moyle and Kuehn 1964). Early efforts focused on removing large numbers of adult carp, often by targeting their winter aggregations using seine nets. Such was the strategy in Minnesota in 1930s and 40s, where carp were systematically removed with nets in dozens of...

Contacts: Jon Amberg