Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

Invasive Species

US Department of the Interior Invasive Species Blog:

Invasive Species: Finding solutions to stop their spread.

Filter Total Items: 43
Date published: January 21, 2020
Status: Active

Invasive Carp Control: Carbon Dioxide

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is being evaluated as a chemical control for invasive carps. Recent work involves investigations on the effectiveness of CO2 as a tool to limit range expansion by blocking upstream migrations (behavioral deterrent) and manage existing populations (lethal control). Data generated from these studies are intended to inform resource managers decisions...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp
Date published: January 17, 2020
Status: Active

Effects of Carbon Dioxide on Non-Target Organisms

Invasive Carp Control: Carbon Dioxide

Chemical controls are a vital component of many effective Integrated Pest Management plans. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is being evaluated as a new fishery chemical for invasive carps...

Date published: January 16, 2020
Status: Active

Carbon Dioxide as an Invasive Carp Lethal Control

Invasive Carp Control: Carbon Dioxide

Management agencies often rely on commercial harvest for invasive carp population control. Piscicides, or fish toxicants, are an alternative method that could supplement Integrated Pest...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp
Date published: January 16, 2020
Status: Active

Engineering and Testing of Carbon Dioxide Infusion Systems

Invasive Carp Control: Carbon Dioxide

Management agencies have identified key pinch-points where there is a need to block invasive carp passage. Recent studies have shown that carbon dioxide (CO2) can be an effective...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp
Date published: January 16, 2020
Status: Active

Carbon Dioxide as an Invasive Carp Behavioral Deterrent

Invasive Carp Control: Carbon Dioxide

Introduction of invasive carps into public waters of the United States has resulted in a large effort to limit dispersal beyond the Mississippi River watershed. Navigational structures...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp
Date published: June 5, 2019
Status: Active

Developing RNA Interference to Control Zebra Mussels

We aim to develop a control tool for eliminating zebra mussels that exploits natural gene regulation mechanisms (RNA-induced gene silencing; RNAi) to be specific to zebra mussels without non-target effects. In addition to the nuisance they pose, Pimentel et al. estimated that zebra mussels cost the U.S. economy over $1 billion annually. Zebra mussels are among the International Union...

Date published: July 23, 2018
Status: Active

BOR environmental DNA sampling for invasive mussels at USGS gages

As part of an ongoing project funded by the Bureau of Reclamation and lead by the Idaho Water Sciences Center (IDWSC) and Northern Rocky Mountain Research Center (NOROCK), the Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) will analyze environmental DNA samples collected at gage stations directly downstream of multiple reservoirs throughout the Columbia River Basin. The goal of this...

Contacts: Jon Amberg
Date published: July 23, 2018
Status: Active

Assessment of newly developed acoustic stimuli for manipulating movement of bigheaded carps

Bigheaded carps, like other cyprinids, have specialized structures known as Weberian ossicles that increase their hearing range and sensitivity. Recent results from controlled laboratory studies have indicated that playback of a recording of an outboard boat motor was effective at altering silver and bighead carp behavior. 

Date published: July 17, 2017
Status: Active

Work with U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – Reed Canary Grass

Impact of UMESC Science

To generate decision-making information needed for refuge managers on how to treat reed canary grass in order to maintain or restore target communities and the wildlife they support.

Contacts: Larry Robinson
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Increasing Efficiency and Throughput of eDNA

The results from this study will provide protocols for the collection, processing and analysis of environmental deoxyribonucleic acids (eDNA) samples for monitoring aquatic invasive species like Asian carp. These protocols have the potential to be used by fishery management agencies to monitor aquatic invasive species throughout the United States.

Contacts: Jon Amberg
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Register New Lampricide Active Ingredients and End-use Formulations and Maintain Registered Products in Compliance with United States and Canadian Pesticide Regulations

The USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) provides regulatory affairs assistance to the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), state and private partners in matters regarding numerous registrations of the lampricides TFM and niclosamide in the U.S. and Canada.  The result of this technical...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Improving the Accuracy and Precision of Predictions of TFM-niclosamide Concentrations for Treatment of Sea Lamprey Spawning Tributaries

The results of this research may lead to a more efficient use of the lampricides used to control lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. If lamprey populations are left uncontrolled, the effects on commercial and sport fisheries in the Great Lakes would be devastating.

The treatment of sea lamprey spawning tributaries with mixtures of the piscicides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM...