Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

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WARC conducts relevant and objective research, develops new approaches and technologies, and disseminates scientific information needed to understand, manage, conserve, and restore wetlands and other aquatic and coastal ecosystems and their associated plant and animal communities throughout the nation and the world.

By tracking the health and stability of amphibian populations, the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) provides valuable information on environmental relationships and population dynamics.

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Have you seen me? Report sightings of non-native and invasive aquatic plant and animal species to the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) information resource.

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Coastal Louisiana wetlands make up the seventh largest delta on Earth and support the largest commercial fishery in the lower 48 states. However, Louisiana currently undergoes ~90% of the total coastal wetland loss in the continental U.S.

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News

A lionfish floating in blue water
July 27, 2016

Genetics and tracking helps USGS researchers learn where the invasive fish are now – and where they may go next.

Newly discovered cavefish species, the Oaxaca Cave Sleeper
June 27, 2016

Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey and Louisiana State University have identified a new genus and species of cavefish from Mexico, the Oaxaca Cave Sleeper, which is the first cave-adapted sleeper goby to be found in the Western Hemisphere.

Don DeAngelis Staff Profile Image
May 4, 2016

A special edition of the journal Ecological Modelling has been dedicated to Donald DeAngelis, U.S. Geological Survey Research Ecologist, in honor of his 70th birthday. A a prominent contributor to the journal, DeAngelis has played a decisive role in the progression of ecological and mathematical modeling, specifically related to individual-based approaches.

Publications

Learning and adaptation in waterfowl conservation: By chance or by design?
Year Published: 2016

Learning and adaptation in waterfowl conservation: By chance or by design?

The most recent revision of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan seeks to increase the adaptive capacity of the management enterprise to cope with accelerating changes in climate, land-use patterns, agency priorities, and the waterfowl and wetlands constituency. Institutional and cultural changes of the magnitude envisioned are necessarily slow, messy processes, involving many actors who...Read More

Greenhouse gas emissions from a created brackish marsh in eastern North Carolina
Year Published: 2016

Greenhouse gas emissions from a created brackish marsh in eastern North Carolina

Tidal marsh creation helps remediate global warming because tidal wetlands are especially proficient at sequestering carbon (C) in soils. However, greenhouse gas (GHG) losses can offset the climatic benefits gained from C storage depending on how these tidal marshes are constructed and managed. This study attempts to determine the GHG emissions from a 4–6 year old created brackish marsh, what...Read More

Regulation of the hunting season as a tool for adaptive harvest management — First results for pink-footed geese Anser brachyrhynchus
Year Published: 2016

Regulation of the hunting season as a tool for adaptive harvest management — First results for pink-footed geese Anser brachyrhynchus

Adjustment of hunting season length is often used to regulate harvest of waterbirds but the effects are disputed. We describe the first results of season length extension on the harvest of the pink-footed goose, which has been selected as the first test case of adaptive harvest management of waterbirds in Europe. In Denmark, the season (previously 1 September to 31 December) was extended to...Read More