Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

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USGS
December 31, 2018

Cuban treefrog - Osteopilus septentrionalis

Can you hear the difference between the non-native Cuban treefrog and two common Louisiana native treefrogs? Cuban treefrogs’ call is distinctive. Biologist Paul Moler of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission recorded them in South Florida. Credit: Paul Moler, used with permission.

USGS
December 31, 2018

Green treefrog - Hyla cinerea

Green treefrogs call from their favorite habitat, rivers and lakes. They’re native to Louisiana and Florida, where these were recorded. Credit: Paul Moler, used with permission.

USGS
December 31, 2018

Squirrel treefrog - Hyla squirella (Marion)

Squirrel treefrogs are also native to Florida and Louisiana. Hear them calling from ditches, puddles and other ephemeral pools of water. Credit: Paul Moler, used with permission.
 

Bee pollinating a flowering coastal prairie plant
June 15, 2018

Bee pollinating a flowering coastal prairie plant - WARC

Bee pollinating a flowering coastal prairie plant

1985-2018 Lion fish invasion. Ecosystems Mission Area. Wetlands and Aquatic Research Center
May 16, 2018

1985-2018 Lionfish Invasion

Lionfish invasion (1985-2018). Lionfish invaded US Atlantic coastal waters, the Caribbean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico with unprecedented, alarming speed. Though reports of sightings date back to the 1980s, it is only recently that the species has exploded in numbers and range. In fact, the lionfish invasion is the 

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A USGS scientist holds a cold-stunned sea turtle while it recovers from the effects
January 31, 2018

Rescuing Sea Turtles from the Cold

David Seay, a contract biologist working with the USGS, holds a green sea turtle that is recovering from the effects of cold-stunning in St. Joseph Bay. Photo by Margaret Lamont, USGS.

An image of federal and state workers and volunteers rescuing a large sea turtle and carrying it down a side walk.
January 31, 2018

Rescuing Sea Turtles from the Cold

USGS scientists Daniel Catizone (left) and David Seay (center) joined federal and state workers and volunteers in rescuing an estimated 1,000 cold-stunned sea turtles, making this the second largest sea turtle rescue of the 21st century. Photo by Margaret Lamont, USGS

A USGS scientist measures a rescued sea turtle while in a boat
January 31, 2018

Rescuing Sea Turtles from the Cold

USGS scientist Margaret Lamont measures a Kemp’s ridley sea turtle recovered from the cold waters of St. Joseph Bay. Rescued sea turtles are weighed, measured andmarked with an identifier, and are examined to determine if they need medical attention. Photo by USGS. 

A USGS scientist rescues a cold-stunned sea turtle from a mud flat
January 31, 2018

Rescuing Sea Turtles from the Cold

USGS scientist Margaret Lamont, who has studied sea turtles in Florida since 1995, carries a cold-stunned green sea turtle from the mud flats of St. Joseph Bay. Photo by USGS.

Two scientists walk along a beach rescuing cold-stunned sea turtles.
January 31, 2018

Rescuing Sea Turtles from the Cold

Eglin Air Force Base biologist Kathy Gault (left) and Dave Seay (right), a contract biologist working with the USGS, hauled cold-stunned sea turtles to safety along the icy shore of Cape San Blas. Scientists and licensed volunteers walked the beaches and marshes, loading cold-stunned sea turtles into kayaks. Once full, kayaks could weigh more than 400 pounds and had to be

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A boat full of rescued sea turtles.
January 31, 2018

Rescuing Sea Turtles from the Cold

Scientists and volunteers use nets to scoop the immobile sea turtles out of St. Joseph Bay before transporting them to safety. Photo by USGS. 

A photo of a cold-stunned sea turtle in shallow water.
January 31, 2018

Rescuing Sea Turtles from the Cold

When water temperatures drop below 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius), cold-blooded sea turtles, like this Kemp’s ridley, can become cold-stunned. They are unable to swim or even raise their heads out of the water to breathe, which can lead to drowning. Photo by Margaret Lamont, USGS