Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

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Filter Total Items: 37
Black bellied salamander

This black-bellied salamander (Desmognathus quadramaculatus) was found in the Citico Creek Wilderness, Cherokee National Forest, Tennessee.

Queen angelfish - Hurricane Hole, Virgin Islands
September 18, 2009

A queen angelfish peers through the safety of the mangrove roots across the rich colors and textures of corals, sponges, urchins, and algae. Queen angelfish feed almost exclusively on sponges, which are abundant in these mangroves.

Aerial view of coastal marshes along Bayou Dufrene in Louisiana
September 12, 2012

An aerial view of coastal marshes along Bayou Dufrene, southwest of the town of Dulac in Louisiana's Terrebonne Basin.

Brown Marsh in Southeast Louisiana
2012 (approx.)

Brown Marsh observed in southeastern Terrebonne Basin, La

Manatee swims in a Florida spring
2012 (approx.)

Manatee swims in a Florida spring

Two manatees with radio transmitters attached
2012 (approx.)

Two manatees with radio transmitters attached

USGS Researcher with Manatee
2012 (approx.)

USGS researcher collects data on manatee in Florida spring.

Coastal wetlands near Port Fourchon, Louisiana, in the northern Gulf of Mexico
2013 (approx.)

To understand how changes in rainfall and temperature might affect coastal wetlands in the northern Gulf of Mexico, USGS researchers conducted field studies at 10 estuaries in five states (Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida). The fieldwork took place in a variety of coastal wetland types, including mangroves, marshes, and salt flats.

Red bubblegum coral
2013 (approx.)

Red bubblegum coral (Paragorgia) and several colonies of Primnoa occupy a boulder in close proximity to an anemone and sea star, at approximately 440 meters depth in Norfolk Canyon. Image courtesy of Deepwater Canyons 2013 – Pathways to the Abyss, NOAA-OER/BOEM/USGS

Image: USGS Science Aids Manatees
2015 (approx.)

For nearly four decades, the U.S. Geological Survey's Sirenia Project has been committed to understanding the biology and ecology of the West Indian manatee to aid managers in actions that could best help the population. To do this, USGS manatee researchers rely on a variety of tools and techniques.

January 30, 2016

This video was shot in Three Sisters Springs at the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, Florida. The footage was captured using a GoPro while conducting health check-ups and taking photography for population research on Jan. 30, 2014.

Special Thanks
Dr. Bob Bonde, USGS and the dozens of volunteers who conduct annual manatee health assessments.

Music
"Music for Manatees" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Filmed on location in Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, January 30, 2014.

USGS Manatee Research: http://on.doi.gov/manatees

This work was conducted under authority of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Research permit number MA791721 issued to Sirenia Project, USGS.

A lionfish floating in blue water
February 2, 2016

A lionfish floating in blue water. Photo: Richard Whitcombe. (Permission provided by photographer)

Deep-Sea Coral: Lophelia pertusa
April 26, 2016

Live Lophelia pertusa is white because the calcium carbonate skeleton shows through the nonpigmented coral tissue. Dead coral is soon covered in a brown biofilm. The red-orange squat lobster (Eumunida picta) in the center of the photo is prepared to catch its dinner.

WRP Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana
April 26, 2016

Wetlands Reserve Program site in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana.  Ten years ago, this landowner worked with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service through the Wetlands Reserve Program to design and construct this slough as part of a plan to restore this field’s natural wetland hydrology.

WRP St. Landry Parish, Louisiana
April 26, 2016

Wetlands Reserve Program site in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana.  Changes in a local river resulted in the landowner’s fields flooding on a regular basis. The landowner worked through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service to restore his fields to their natural wetland state.

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)
April 26, 2016

A great blue heron standing in the marsh at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge near the Kennedy Space Center.

Red Mangrove Trees
April 26, 2016

Red mangrove trees fringe the shoreline of a bay in Hurricane Hole, U.S. Virgin Islands. 

WRP Morehouse Parish, Louisiana
April 26, 2016

Wetlands Reserve Program site in Morehouse Parish, Louisiana.  Green tree frogs rest on a Wetlands Reserve Program easement boundary sign in Morehouse Parish, Louisiana.

Newly discovered cavefish species, the Oaxaca Cave Sleeper
2016 (approx.)

This Oaxaca Cave Sleeper is one of thirteen specimens collected from a cave beneath a reservoir on Mexico's Tonto River. It lacks eyes, is unpigmented, and has sensory adaptations characteristic of fish that live in total darkness. Thuis is the holotype, the example used to describe and name this newly identified species. Credit: Howard L. Jelks and Stephen J. Walsh, USGS

Laboratory specimen of newly-discovered Oaxaca Cave Sleeper
2016 (approx.)

A laboratory preparation of a Oaxaca Cave Sleeper specimen shows the absence of eyes in this newly identified cavefish species. Credit: Stephen J. Walsh, USGS

Frosted flatwoods salamander
2016 (approx.)

Frosted flatwoods salamander, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, Florida

Frosted flatwoods salamander
2016 (approx.)

Frosted flatwoods salamander in St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, Florida

Three sailfin catfish found in the Big Cypress National Preserve
March 23, 2017

The sailfin catfish is one of 13 species of nonnative fish that biologists discovered during the Fish Slam in Big Cypress National Preserve, March 23, 2017.

 

Pike killifish found in Big Cypress
March 23, 2017

The pike killifish, native to Mexico and Central America, was one of 13 nonnative fish species that biologists discovered during the two-day Fish Slam in Big Cypress National Preserve, March 22 and 23, 2017.

 

Scientist holding a laptop and equipment, standing in a green field.
2017 (approx.)

Vegetation assessments are part of an effort to produce seamless, consistent, and high resolution landcover data for the northern portion of the western gulf coastal plain. This geography was once dominated by tallgrass prairie and has undergone dramatic change with less than 1% of this natural habitat in existence.

Tallgrass prairie provides a suite of ecosystem services including enhancing beneficial insect and pollinator populations, improving water quality, sequestering carbon, and reducing runoff and erosion. Many of the remaining remnants are along the coastal fringes of the historic range and vulnerable to sea level rise. Due to the vast benefits associated with this diverse, productive, and threatened ecosystem, conservation entities across the Western Gulf Coastal Plain are working toward a collaborative, strategic, landscape scale approach to conservation planning.

Our work will provide baseline data to enhance the ability of decision makers to communicate, prioritize, and implement restoration activities and other habitat enhancement actions associated with water sheds within this geography.

Phragmites under stress in Pass A Loutre, Louisiana
2017 (approx.)

Brown patches and brown stems show stress in this phagmites (roseau cane) stand in Pass A Loutre Wildlife Management Area, a tract of state-owned land in Louisiana's bird foot delta, where the Mississippi River meets the Gulf of Mexico. An ongoing phragmites was first discovered in spring 2017 and blamed on an invasive scale insect from Asia. But a new USGS report, based on satellite imaging and a special technique for assessing marsh vegetation, finds the affected grasses began declining in 2015 and suggests the insect may not be the sole cause. The phragmites decline could lead to the loss of ecologically and economically important wetlands in coastal Louisiana.

Aerial view of southeast Louisiana coastal marshes
2017 (approx.)

An aerial view of southeast Louisiana coastal marshes. 

Map shows early wetland losses in red, recent losses in purple
July 10, 2017

This map shows the historic trend in wetland losses, with early losses in red and the most recent ones in purple.

Satellite images of the same marsh in 2008 and 2016
2017 (approx.)

Satellite images of the same wetland taken in 2008 and 2016 show a wetland restoration project has produced some gains in marsh area.

chart of vegetation change in the bird's foot delta
2017 (approx.)

Chart showing changes in vegetation density in the Mississippi River delta in Louisiana, May 2015-May 2016. From a USGS Open File Report published in July 2017 by co-authors Elijah Ramsey III and Amina Rangoonwala,

Map of offshore survey sites from Virginia to Georgia
September 12, 2017

Map of target areas to be surveyed during the first phase of the Deepwater Atlantic Habitats II study, 
DEEP SEARCH, including seep targets. USGS image.

Map of offshore survey sites from Virginia to Georgia
September 12, 2017

Map of target areas to be surveyed during the first phase of the 
Deepwater Atlantic Habitats II study,  DEEP SEARCH, including seep targets. USGS image.

Graph of the rate of change in Lousiana coastal wetlands from the 1930s to the present
2017 (approx.)

Graph of land area change rate in coastal Louisiana from 1932–2016.  The red line approximates the long-term land area change rate. 95 out of 100 statistical analyses would produce a very similar trend (dotted blue lines). Credit: USGS