Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

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WARC conducts relevant and objective research, develops new approaches and technologies, and disseminates scientific information needed to understand, manage, conserve, and restore wetlands and other aquatic and coastal ecosystems and their associated plant and animal communities throughout the nation and the world.

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Sea turtles, pythons, & manatees, oh my: USGS science in Florida

Sea turtles, pythons, & manatees, oh my: USGS science in Florida

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News

A Manatee swimming in Florida waters.
June 13, 2018

U.S. Geological Survey scientists have been honored as Recovery Champions by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Southeast Region for their long-term research efforts on the Florida manatee. 

Image shows USGS scientists in PFDs with an acoustic doppler sensor in a flooded river
May 31, 2018

No one has a crystal ball to foresee what will happen during the 2018 hurricane season that begins June 1, but NOAA forecasters say there’s a 75 percent chance this hurricane season will be at least as busy as a normal year, or busier.

A Cuban treefrog on a palm frond
April 25, 2018

A population of exotic invasive Cuban treefrogs has been discovered in New Orleans, more than 430 miles (700 kilometers) from the nearest known population in Florida, making this the first known breeding population in the mainland United States outside that state, reports a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. 

Scroll down to hear and download calls of Cuban treefrogs and two native treefrogs.

Publications

Year Published: 2018

Quantifying relative importance: Computing standardized effects in models with binary outcomes

Scientists commonly ask questions about the relative importances of processes, and then turn to statistical models for answers. Standardized coefficients are typically used in such situations, with the goal being to compare effects on a common scale. Traditional approaches to obtaining standardized coefficients were developed with idealized...

Grace, James B.; Johnson, Darren; Lefcheck, Jonathan S.; Byrnes, Jarrett E.K.
Grace, J.B., Johnson, D.J., Lefcheck, J.S., and Byrnes, J.E.K., 2018, Quantifying relative importance: computing standardized effects in models with binary outcomes: Ecosphere, v. 9, no. 6, art. e02283, http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.2283.

Year Published: 2018

Coastal wetland adaptation to sea level rise: Quantifying potential for landward migration and coastal squeeze

Coastal wetland ecosystems are expected to migrate landwards in response to rising seas. However, due to differences in topography and coastal urbanization, estuaries vary in their ability to accommodate migration. Low‐lying urban areas can constrain migration and lead to wetland loss (i.e. coastal squeeze), especially where existing wetlands...

Borchert, Sinéad M.; Osland, Michael J.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; Griffith, Kereen
Borchert, S.M., Osland, M.J., Enwright, N.M., and Griffith, K.T., 2018, Coastal wetland adaptation to sea level rise: Quantifying potential for landward migration and coastal squeeze: Journal of Applied Ecology, Early View, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.13169.

Year Published: 2018

Partial migration of the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum (Bonnaterre), from the Dry Tortugas Islands

Nurse sharks have not previously been known to migrate. Nurse sharks of the Dry Tortugas (DRTO) mating population have a highly predictable periodic residency cycle, returning to the Dry Tortugas Courtship and Mating Ground (DTCMG) annually (males) or bi- to triennially (females) during the June/July mating season. For 23 years we have followed...

Pratt, Harold L.; Pratt, Theo C.; Morley, Danielle; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan K.; Collins, Angela; Carrier, Jeffrey C.; Hart, Kristen M.; Whitney, N.M.
Pratt, H.L., Jr., Pratt, T.C., Morley, D., Lowerre-Barbieri, S., Collins, A., Carrier, J.C., Hart, K.M., and Whitney, N.M., 2018, Partial migration of the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum (Bonnaterre), from the Dry Tortugas Islands: Environmental Biology of Fishes, v. 101, no. 4., p. 515-530, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10641-017-0711-1.