Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

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WARC conducts relevant and objective research, develops new approaches and technologies, and disseminates scientific information needed to understand, manage, conserve, and restore wetlands and other aquatic and coastal ecosystems and their associated plant and animal communities throughout the nation and the world.

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Sea turtles, pythons, & manatees, oh my: USGS science in Florida

Sea turtles, pythons, & manatees, oh my: USGS science in Florida

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News

Hurricane Hole, St. John, US Virgin Islands
October 25, 2017

Coral reef expert Caroline Rogers was the only USGS employee in the Virgin Islands when the Category 5 storm hit.

Tadpole with SPI
September 19, 2017

A deadly amphibian disease called severe Perkinsea infections, or SPI, is the cause of many large-scale frog die-offs in the United States, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey

Red bubblegum coral
September 13, 2017

Scientists beginning a three-week research cruises to study deep-sea corals, canyons and seeps departed from Norfolk, Virginia on September 12 after a one-day delay due to the effects of Hurricane Irma. USGS research oceanographer Amanda Demopoulos is the lead scientist for this cruise, the first of three planned as part of a four-and-a-half year study.

Publications

Year Published: 2018

Numerical modeling of salt marsh morphological change induced by Hurricane Sandy

The salt marshes of Jamaica Bay serve as a recreational outlet for New York City residents, mitigate wave impacts during coastal storms, and provide habitat for critical wildlife species. Hurricanes have been recognized as one of the critical drivers of coastal wetland morphology due to their effects on hydrodynamics and sediment transport,...

Hu, Kelin; Chen, Qin; Wang, Hongqing; Hartig, Ellen K.; Orton, Philip M.
Hu, Kelin, Chen, Qin, Wang, Hongqing, Hartig, E.K., and Orton, P.M., 2018, Numerical modeling of salt marsh morphological change induced by Hurricane Sandy: Coastal Engineering, v. 132, p. 63-81, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.coastaleng.2017.11.001.

Year Published: 2017

Concepts and practices: Estimating abundance of prey species using hierarchical model-based approaches

Tigers predominantly prey on large ungulate species, such as sambar (Cervus unicolor), red deer (Cervus elaphus), gaur (Bos gaurus), banteng (Bos javanicus), chital (Axis axis), muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak), wild pig (Sus scrofa), and bearded pig (Sus barbatus). The density of a tiger population is strongly correlated with the density of such prey...

Dorazio, Robert; Kumar, N. Samba; Royle, Andy; Gopalaswamy, Arjun M.
Dorazio, R.M., Kumar, N.S., Royle, J.A., and Gopalaswamy, A.M., 2017, Concepts and practices: estimating abundance of prey species using hierarchical model-based approaches in Karanth, K.U., and Nichols, J.D., eds., Methods for Monitoring Tiger and Prey Populations: Springer, Singapore, p. 137-162, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-5436-5_8.

Year Published: 2017

Effects of host injury on susceptibility of marine reef fishes to ectoparasitic gnathiid isopods

The importance of the role that parasites play in ecological communities is becoming increasingly apparent. However much about their impact on hosts and thus populations and communities remains poorly understood. A common observation in wild populations is high variation in levels of parasite infestation among hosts. While high variation could be...

Jenkins, William G.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Sikkel, Paul C.
Jenkins, W.G., Demopoulos, A.W.J., and Sikkel, P.C., 2017, Effects of host injury on susceptibility of marine reef fishes to ectoparasitic gnathiid isopods: Symbiosis, First Online, https://doi.org/10.1007/s13199-017-0518-z.