Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Multimedia

Explore WARC's multimedia resources.

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Image: Flat Tree Oyster (Isognomon alatus)
November 5, 2009

Flat Tree Oyster (Isognomon alatus)

At high tide, the red bark of the Red Mangrove Trees is submerged, creating a brilliant reflection at the water's surface. Flat Tree Oysters (Isognomon alatus) grow on the upper portions of the roots.

Image: Sponges in the Hurricane Hole mangroves
October 10, 2009

Sponges in the Hurricane Hole mangroves

Sponges, such as the blue, green and orange ones growing on these prop roots, provide much of the color in the Hurricane Hole mangroves.

Image: Finger Coral (Porites sp), Lettuce Coral (Agaricia sp)
October 10, 2009

Finger Coral (Porites sp), Lettuce Coral (Agaricia sp)

Small corals have settled and begun to grow on the prop roots (Finger Coral, Porites sp. on the left; Lettuce Coral, Agaricia sp. on the right).

Image: Giant Caribbean Anemone (Condylactis gigantea)
October 4, 2009

Giant Caribbean Anemone (Condylactis gigantea)

Giant Caribbean Anemones (Condylactis gigantea) display a wide range of colors but often have bright pink or purple tips.

Image: Great Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda)
September 27, 2009

Great Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda)

An adult Great Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) bares his teeth.

Image: Rock Beauty Angelfish (Holacanthus tricolor)
September 27, 2009

Rock Beauty Angelfish (Holacanthus tricolor)

The beautiful yellow and black Rock Beauty (Holacanthus tricolor) is much less abundant than the other members of the Angelfish Family.

Image: Fire Sponge (Tedania ignis)
September 27, 2009

Fire Sponge (Tedania ignis)

Bright red Fire Sponges (Tedania ignis) can cause severe reactions if touched.

Image: Spotted Trunkfish (Lactophrys bicaudalis)
September 27, 2009

Spotted Trunkfish (Lactophrys bicaudalis)

Spotted Trunkfishes (Lactophrys bicaudalis) feed mostly on Sea Squirts (Tunicates).

Image: Queen Angelfish Hides in Mangrove Prop Roots
September 18, 2009

Queen Angelfish Hides in Mangrove Prop Roots

A Queen Angelfish peers through the safety of the mangrove roots across the rich colors and textures of corals, sponges, urchins, and algae. Queen Angelfish feed almost exclusively on sponges, which are abundant in these mangroves.

Image: Juvenile Barracuda
September 18, 2009

Juvenile Barracuda

Barracudas of all sizes, from the juveniles shown here, to adults over 3 feet long, are common inhabitants of the mangroves.

Image: Mountainous Star Coral (Montastraea faveolata)
September 18, 2009

Mountainous Star Coral (Montastraea faveolata)

This colony of Mountainous Star Coral (Montastraea faveolata) is so large (about 3 feet across) that it must have been growing before the severe bleaching and disease episode in 2005/2006 that caused so much coral mortality on St. John's reefs.

Queen angelfish - Hurricane Hole, Virgin Islands
September 18, 2009

Queen angelfish - Hurricane Hole, Virgin Islands

A queen angelfish peers through the safety of the mangrove roots across the rich colors and textures of corals, sponges, urchins, and algae. Queen angelfish feed almost exclusively on sponges, which are abundant in these mangroves.