EROS CalVal Center of Excellence

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Filter Total Items: 13
Date published: September 4, 2020

New Edition of JACIE Remote Sensing Compendium Released for 2020

The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and its Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) partners have just released the second edition of the JACIE land remote sensing satellite compendium.

Date published: August 25, 2020

Lunar Calibration with Landsat

The next full moon will come on September 2, 2020. And when you look up to see it, so will Landsat 8. As probably the most accurate Earth imaging satellite system, Landsat has multiple ways of calibrating data to ensure its accuracy and interoperability with other satellites. One of the strategies the calibration engineers use is lunar calibration.

Date published: June 17, 2020

Calibration Test Site Becomes Agricultural Hotspot

The Landsat satellites were designed to detect landscape changes over time. However, sometimes what Landsat needs to see on the Earth’s surface is no change at all.

Date published: May 12, 2020

Data Quality, Geometric Accuracy are Key Topics for 2020 JACIE and ECCOE Workshops

In a world where observing Earth’s landscapes from space has become more common for government agencies and commercial ventures, there is a question currently getting a lot of attention: Is there a way to make images from all those different and varied systems usable with each other?

Date published: December 13, 2019

Landsat, EROS Factor Heavily in New National Policy Plan for Earth Observation

The Landsat program and the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center have long held and important place in the nation’s Earth observation (EO) policy.

Date published: October 28, 2019

JACIE Team Meets with Man who Inspired Satellite Compendium

The Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) recently released a compendium of Land Remote Sensing Satellites.

The need for a quick-reference guide to satellite sensors is important for plenty of reasons, but the circular points to one man in particular as an inspiration for...

Date published: October 2, 2019

Guest editors from USGS EROS contribute to Journal of Remote Sensing

Manuscripts for a special issue of Remote Sensing  through MPDI titled "Cross-Calibration and Interoperability of Remote Sensing Instruments" are being accepted until July 31, 2020.

Attribution: Science Support
Date published: August 13, 2019

Imagery Evaluation Workshops to Focus on Interoperability, Opportunity

With the global inventory of Earth observation satellites growing by the week, questions of data quality and integration take on great significance.

Date published: July 22, 2019

New ECCOE Publication Indicates Improved Ground Control

A recent publication by the ECCOE Geometry team shows improved accuracy in ground control by deploying a triangulation method on a continent by continent basis.

Date published: June 26, 2019

2019 Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation—Land remote sensing satellite compendium

The 2019 Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation— Land Remote Sensing Satellite Compendium, released June 17, 2019, is the sum of three years of data collection on the global status of Earth imaging satellite platforms.

Date published: October 5, 2018

EROS Leads Dialogue on Future of Earth Observation

Forty-six years ago, there was a single Earth observation satellite circling the globe – Landsat 1.

By 1988, four countries operated such satellites. In 2018, there were 45 Earth observing satellites launched by September. Another 36 launches are planned this year.

The number of countries operating satellites? That’s swollen to 54.

Date published: August 16, 2018

Landsat Adds Value, Reliability to Cubesat Imagery

Over the past five years, private companies have launched hundreds of shoebox-sized Earth observation “cubesat” satellites into space with promises of high-resolution daily imagery.

The rapid emergence of smallsats begs the question: What role does a legacy satellite like Landsat play in the development and use of these relatively inexpensive orbiters?