Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Explore System Dynamics

USGS researchers investigate factors that influence the ecological and spatial resiliency of ecosystems and landscapes and the capacity to support habitats and species. By understanding the patterns and process of how ecosystems respond to disturbances and stressors, USGS researchers can inform conservation and restoration planning and guide management actions. 

Filter Total Items: 6

Sediment Mobility Research

Informing Management of the Nearshore and Continental Shelf
link

Sediment Mobility Research

Informing Management of the Nearshore and Continental Shelf
Learn More

Use of Lidar in Coastal Studies

Since 1998, airborne light detection and ranging, or lidar, capabilities have been developed and utilized to support CMHRP research projects and hazard assessments. Lidar is a remote-sensing technique that measures distance to a target by sending out light energy and detecting how long it takes the reflected pulses to return to the sensor. Lidar data provide information about the elevation, shape...
link

Use of Lidar in Coastal Studies

Since 1998, airborne light detection and ranging, or lidar, capabilities have been developed and utilized to support CMHRP research projects and hazard assessments. Lidar is a remote-sensing technique that measures distance to a target by sending out light energy and detecting how long it takes the reflected pulses to return to the sensor. Lidar data provide information about the elevation, shape...
Learn More

National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards

Research to identify areas that are most vulnerable to coastal change hazards including beach and dune erosion, long-term shoreline change, and sea-level rise.
link

National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards

Research to identify areas that are most vulnerable to coastal change hazards including beach and dune erosion, long-term shoreline change, and sea-level rise.
Learn More

Gulf of Mexico Land Loss Change Assessment: A Cooperative Study with the Bureau of Ocean and Energy Management

Eighty-five percent of the coastal wetland loss in the contiguous United States occurs in the Gulf of Mexico. Documenting and understanding the occurrence of this wetland loss will provide for effective planning, mitigation, and restoration activities.
link

Gulf of Mexico Land Loss Change Assessment: A Cooperative Study with the Bureau of Ocean and Energy Management

Eighty-five percent of the coastal wetland loss in the contiguous United States occurs in the Gulf of Mexico. Documenting and understanding the occurrence of this wetland loss will provide for effective planning, mitigation, and restoration activities.
Learn More

Incorporating Future Change into Current Conservation Planning: Evaluating Wetland Migration along the Gulf of Mexico under Alternative Sea-Level Rise and Urbanization Scenarios

More than half of contiguous U.S. coastal wetlands are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. These highly-productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services and fish and wildlife habitat. Historically, coastal wetlands have adapted to sea-level changes via lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, coastal wetlands will adapt and migrate landward...
link

Incorporating Future Change into Current Conservation Planning: Evaluating Wetland Migration along the Gulf of Mexico under Alternative Sea-Level Rise and Urbanization Scenarios

More than half of contiguous U.S. coastal wetlands are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. These highly-productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services and fish and wildlife habitat. Historically, coastal wetlands have adapted to sea-level changes via lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, coastal wetlands will adapt and migrate landward...
Learn More

Factors Controlling Resilience and Resistance of Coastal Salt Marshes to Sudden Marsh Dieback

Sudden Marsh Dieback - SMD - has been documented for the past two decades throughout coastal areas of the United States. With these large-scale diebacks comes the loss of ecosystem functions and services. USGS scientsts use field work and greenhouse studies to investigate the factors that control the resilience and resistance of coastal salt marshes to SMD.
link

Factors Controlling Resilience and Resistance of Coastal Salt Marshes to Sudden Marsh Dieback

Sudden Marsh Dieback - SMD - has been documented for the past two decades throughout coastal areas of the United States. With these large-scale diebacks comes the loss of ecosystem functions and services. USGS scientsts use field work and greenhouse studies to investigate the factors that control the resilience and resistance of coastal salt marshes to SMD.
Learn More