Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

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Located on six hundred acres along the James River Valley near Jamestown, North Dakota, the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center is one of seventeen USGS Science Centers that develop and disseminate the scientific information needed to understand, conserve, and manage the Nation’s rich biological resources.

Learn more about our science

Migratory-bird center of excellence

Migratory-bird center of excellence

The Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center is known for its long history of meeting the migratory-bird research needs of Department of the Interior and the Nation.

Migratory Birds

Insect pollinators of the Great Plains

Insect pollinators of the Great Plains

Pollinators support both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Northern Prairie scientists are studying factors affecting the health of insect pollinators across the northern Great Plains.

Pollinator Research

Minimizing impacts to wildlife and ecosystems

Minimizing impacts to wildlife and ecosystems

Providing information needed to reduce the impacts of oil, gas, biofuel and wind energy development in the northern Great Plains is a focus of several research efforts at NPWRC.

Species Stressors

News

Date published: October 19, 2018

Honey Bee Helpers: It Takes a Village to Conserve a Colony

Do you eat fruits and vegetables? What about nuts? If so, you can thank an insect pollinator, usually a honey bee. These small insects play a major role in pollinating the world’s plants, including those we eat regularly. They also increase our nation’s crop values each year by more than 15 billion dollars.

Date published: May 21, 2018

Scientists Collecting Bird Data on Grasslands in Montana this Spring

Now through late July, 2018, U.S. Geological Survey scientists will conduct fieldwork on public lands in Phillips and Valley counties near Malta and Glasgow, Montana, as part of a grassland bird project.

Date published: August 30, 2017

Public Invitation: Jamestown Science Center Opens Doors for Interactive Experience

The public is invited to attend a free, family-friendly open house at a local U.S. Geological Survey center for ecology research on Saturday, September 16.  

Publications

Year Published: 2019

Multi-element fingerprinting of waters to evaluate connectivity among depressional wetlands

Establishing the connectivity among depressional wetlands is important for their proper management, conservation and restoration. In this study, the concentrations of 38 elements in surface water and porewater of depressional wetlands were investigated to determine chemical and hydrological connectivity of three hydrological types:...

Yuan, Yuxiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Mushet, David M.; Otte, Marinus L.
Yuan, Y. Zhu, ., Mushet, D.M., and Otte, M.L. 2018. Multi-element fingerprinting of waters to evaluate connectivity among depressional wetlands: Ecological Indicators https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.10.033

Year Published: 2019

Mortality in Aransas-Wood Buffalo Whooping Cranes: Timing, location, and causes

For long-lived species with low fecundity rates, population growth rate can be sensitive to changes in annual survival. Understanding where, when, and why animals die provides useful information for prioritizing conservation practices designed to increase survival. As part of a satellite tracking study, we identified 19 confirmed and suspected...

Pearse, Aaron T.; Brandt, David; Hartup, Barry K.; Bidwell, Mark T.
Pearse, A.T., D.A. Brandt, B.K. Hartup, and M.T. Bidwell. 2018. Mortality in Aransas-Wood Buffalo whooping cranes: timing, location, and causes. In J.B. French, S.J. Converse, and J.E. Austin, editors. Whooping Cranes: Biology and Conservation. Biodiversity of the World: Conservation from Genes to Landscapes. Academic Press, San Diego, CA

Year Published: 2019

Revisiting the historic distribution and habitats of the Whooping Crane

The endangered Whooping Crane (Grus americana) historically had a wide distribution that covered diverse ecoregions across North America while retaining consistent habitat preferences within each ecoregion. We reevaluate the historic information compiled by Robert Porter Allen in 1952 and added 74 other records. Based on the ecological...

Austin, Jane E.; Hayes, Matthew A.; Barzen, Jeb A.
Austin, J.E., Hayes, M.A., Barzen, J.A. 2018. Revisiting the historic distribution and habitats of the whooping crane. In: J.B. French, Converse, S.J., and Austin, J.E., editors. Whooping Cranes: Biology and Conservation. Biodiversity of the World: Conservation from Genes to Landscapes. Academic Press, San Diego, CA. p 25-88.