Oregon Water Science Center

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Welcome to the USGS in Oregon. Our mission is to explore the natural world around us and provide reliable scientific information to help Federal, State, and local agencies, Tribes, and the public make well-informed decisions. Our research is widely used to manage Oregon's water resources for the benefit and safety of people and the environment. 

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Current Stream Conditions

Current Stream Conditions

See what is happening in streams near you. View real-time stream data for streams around Oregon.

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Weekly Science Seminar

Weekly Science Seminar

Our lunchtime seminars are held Tuesdays from 12pm to 1 pm and are open to the public.

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News

Date published: September 27, 2019

USGS-PSU Partnership

In June 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Portland State University (PSU) formally joined together into a partnership working toward collaborative research, education, and outreach.

Date published: September 18, 2019

Lunchtime Seminar Series (Fall 2019)

Our lunchtime seminars are held Tuesdays from 12pm to 1 pm PT. The science lectures are held at the USGS Oregon Water Science Center at 2130 SW 5th Avenue in Portland, OR. The presentations are informal and are open to the public. Please, bring your lunch.

Date published: March 26, 2019

Lunchtime Seminar Series (Spring 2019)

In Spring Term, 2019, the USGS lunchtime seminar is a joint seminar series with the Portland State University School of the Environment (SOE) and Oregon State University.  Seminars are on Tuesdays from noon to 1:00 pm, April 2 through May 28, 2019.

The Spring 2019 seminars are held on PSU's campus in Cramer Hall, Room 53 - 1721 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

Publications

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Year Published: 2019

Seasonality of climatic drivers of flood variability in the conterminous United States

Flood variability due to changes in climate is a major economic and social concern. Climate drivers can affect the amount and distribution of flood-generating precipitation through seasonal shifts in storm tracks. An understanding of how the drivers may change in the future is critical for identifying the regions where the magnitude of floods may...

Dickinson, Jesse E.; Harden, Tessa M.; McCabe, Gregory

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Year Published: 2019

Contaminant concentrations in sediments, aquatic invertebrates, and fish in proximity to rail tracks used for coal transport in the Pacific Northwest: A baseline assessment

Railway transport of coal poses an environmental risk because coal dust contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), mercury (Hg), and other trace metals. In the Pacific Northwest, proposed infrastructure projects could result in an increase in coal transport by train through the Columbia River corridor. Baseline information is needed on...

Hapke, Whitney B; Black, Robert W.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Smith, Cassandra; Johnson, Lyndal; Ylitalo, Gina M; Boyd, Daryle; Davis, Jay W; Eldridge, Sara L.; Nilsen, Elena

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Year Published: 2019

Using the precipitation-runoff modeling system to predict seasonal water availability in the upper Klamath River basin, Oregon and California

Accurate forecasts of the streamflow expected during late spring and summer in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern-central Oregon and northern California are used by water management agencies to balance water allocations for agriculture, aquatic habitat, and hydropower-production needs. Streamflow forecasts are also used by irrigation...

Risley, John C.
Risley, J.C., 2019, Using the precipitation-runoff modeling system to predict seasonal water availability in the upper Klamath River basin, Oregon and California: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2019–5044, 37 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20195044.