Oregon Water Science Center

Environmental Health

Filter Total Items: 21
Date published: April 24, 2018
Status: Active

Oregon Data Release(s)

As a federal research agency, the USGS collects natural resource data all across Oregon. These data may be stored in a variety of databases, including our National Water Information System (NWIS). Other data are stored in the ScienceBase Catalog. Here are recent ...

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Harmful Algal Blooms and Drinking Water in Oregon

The occurrence of toxic blue-green algae causes harmful algal blooms in lakes, reservoirs, and rivers and is a growing threat to public health, with human and animal illness and death reported in at least 43 states.

Date published: January 23, 2018
Status: Active

Ecosystem Effects of Increased Coal Transport Across the Pacific Northwest

Proposed new coal export terminals in Washington and Oregon could increase rail traffic through the Northwest and potentially increase unintended release of coal dust to the environment.

Date published: December 21, 2017
Status: Active

Malheur Lake Light Transmission Study

The Malheur National Wildlife Refuge provides habitat for a variety of highly valued ecosystem services, including shorebirds, waterfowl, and a diversity of other wildlife species. 

Contacts: Tamara Wood
Date published: November 30, 2017
Status: Active

Effects of Highway Runoff on Water Quality

"SELDM facilitates analysis by providing precipitation, pre-storm streamflow, and other variables by region or from hydrologically similar sites."

Date published: August 29, 2017
Status: Active

Upper Klamath Basin Studies

In 1992, the USGS began studying possible causes for the change in trophic status of Upper Klamath Lake. Since then research has expanded to include groundwater, geomorphology, streamflow forecasting, and fish ecology.

Date published: August 22, 2017
Status: Active

Willamette River Studies

Welcome to the Willamette River Study page. Here you will find links to USGS research for the Willamette River and the Willamette River Basin.

Date published: May 18, 2017
Status: Completed

Water Temperature Modeling in the Middle Fork Willamette and South Santiam River Basins

Hills Creek, Lookout Point, and Dexter Dams are located on the Middle Fork Willamette River upstream of Eugene in western Oregon, and are important resources managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for flood control, hydroelectric power, recreation, navigation, and irrigation. On the South Santiam River east of Albany in western Oregon, Green Peter and Foster Dams provide functions...

Contacts: Stewart Rounds
Date published: May 11, 2017
Status: Active

Tualatin River Basin Water Quality Assessment

In 1990, the USGS began assessing water-quality in the Tualatin River. Almost 30 years later, we are still monitoring conditions in the basin.

Contacts: Stewart Rounds
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Water Quality in Keno Reach of the Klamath River

The Klamath River from Link River to Keno Dam experiences poor water-quality conditions on a seasonal basis, creating inhospitable conditions for fish and other aquatic organisms. These problems led the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to prepare a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) plan to bring the river into compliance with water-quality standards. This study uses a hydrodynamic and...

Contacts: Annett Sullivan
Date published: May 2, 2017
Status: Active

City Beavers: Tualatin River Basin Beaver Study

Beavers and their dams are common sights along creeks in the Tualatin River basin. Beaver help create diverse habitats for many other animals, including birds, fish, and amphibians. The USGS studying the affect beaver activity has on the amount and quality of water in local streams, so that agencies in the basin can make strategic management and habitat restoration decisions based on science...

Date published: April 6, 2017

A Thermal Mosaic for the Willamette River

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates 12 dams in the Willamette River Basin. The dams alter natural temperature and hydrologic regimes. Unnatural water temperatures can negatively impact all life stages of salmonid fish species. Water temperature in the mainstem Willamette River regularly exceeds the standard of 18.0 °C (64.4 °F) designated for salmon and trout rearing and migration for...