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Western Fisheries Research Center

Research at the WFRC focuses on the environmental factors responsible for the creation, maintenance, and regulation of fish populations including their interactions in aquatic communities and ecosystems. Within these pages you will find research information on Pacific salmon; western trout, charr, and resident riverine fishes; desert and inland fishes; aquatic ecosystems and their resources. 

News

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Something Fishy from the Western Fisheries Research Center - Spring 2022

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Shedding some light on the issue: Investigating how artificial light at night impacts endangered salmon

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WFRC science featured in Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Oregon Field Guide

Publications

Using a mechanistic framework to model the density of an aquatic parasite Ceratonova shasta

Ceratonova shasta is a myxozoan parasite endemic to the Pacific Northwest of North America that is linked to low survival rates of juvenile salmonids in some watersheds such as the Klamath River basin. The density of C. shasta actinospores in the water column is typically highest in the spring (March–June), and directly influences infection rates for outmigrating juvenile salmonids. Current manage

Comparative virulence of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) genotypes in two koi varieties

Spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV), is a lethal freshwater pathogen of cyprinid fish, and Cyprinus carpio koi is a primary host species. The virus was initially described in the 1960s after outbreaks occurred in Europe, but a global expansion of SVCV has been ongoing since the late 1990s. Genetic typing of SVCV isolates separates them into 4 genotypes that are correlated with geographic origin: I

A climate-mediated shift in the estuarine habitat mosaic limits prey availability and reduces nursery quality for juvenile salmon

The estuarine habitat mosaic supports the reproduction, growth, and survival of resident and migratory fish species by providing a diverse portfolio of unique habitats with varying physical and biological features. Global climate change is expected to result in increasing temperatures, rising sea levels, and changes in riverine hydrology, which will have profound effects on the extent and composit

Science

Pacific Northwest Geologic Mapping: Northern Pacific Border, Cascades and Columbia

The Pacific Northwest is an area created by active and complex geological processes. On its path to the Pacific Ocean, the Columbia River slices through a chain of active volcanoes located along the western margin of the U.S. in Washington, Oregon, and northern California. These volcanoes rest above the active Cascadia subduction zone, which is the boundary where the oceanic tectonic plate dives...
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Pacific Northwest Geologic Mapping: Northern Pacific Border, Cascades and Columbia

The Pacific Northwest is an area created by active and complex geological processes. On its path to the Pacific Ocean, the Columbia River slices through a chain of active volcanoes located along the western margin of the U.S. in Washington, Oregon, and northern California. These volcanoes rest above the active Cascadia subduction zone, which is the boundary where the oceanic tectonic plate dives...
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Tribal Collaboration - Fish Health Program (FHP)

The Fish Health Program has a strong commitment to respond to requests for research and technical support from Tribal fisheries agencies.
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Tribal Collaboration - Fish Health Program (FHP)

The Fish Health Program has a strong commitment to respond to requests for research and technical support from Tribal fisheries agencies.
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Phylogenetics of Ichthyophonus parasites

Ichthyophonus spp. are perhaps the most economically and ecologically important parasites of wild marine fish in the world.
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Phylogenetics of Ichthyophonus parasites

Ichthyophonus spp. are perhaps the most economically and ecologically important parasites of wild marine fish in the world.
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