Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Management and Restoration

Research into the theory, practice, and outcomes of ecological restoration and rehabilitation. It is the study of the traditional and developing practices of renewing, restoring, and adaptively managing degraded, damaged, or destroyed ecosystems through human intervention and action to re-establish ecosystem functions and services. This line of work includes the design of monitoring strategies and assessment of the effectiveness of restoration actions in support of adaptive management.
Filter Total Items: 107
Date published: April 4, 2019
Status: Active

Health Effects and Behavioral Response of Florida Manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to Persistent Algal Bloom and Associated Loss of Seagrass Resources in Brevard County, Florida

USGS researchers are working with partners to assess the health and foraging behavior of Florida manatees in the northern Indian River Lagoon and Banana River, areas that have experienced declining seagrasses due to an extended phytoplankton bloom. 

Date published: March 26, 2019
Status: Active

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Alert Risk Mapper (ARM)

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) program has developed a new tool, the NAS Alert Risk Mapper (ARM), to characterize waterbodies in the conterminous U.S. and Hawaii at potential risk of invasion from a new nonindigenous species sighting.

Date published: March 26, 2019
Status: Active

Defining Native Ranges of U.S. Inland Fishes

Understanding the native versus non-native range of a species can provide useful information about dispersal, population distribution patterns, and human mediated movement across hydrologic barriers. The USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program is working with partners to define native ranges of inland fishes in the United States to help identify which species should be included in the...

Date published: March 26, 2019
Status: Active

Population Ecology of Florida Manatees

USGS is working with partners to understand how the federally protected Florida manatee population changes over time and responds to threats.

Date published: March 5, 2019
Status: Active

Quantitative Framework to Model Risk of Collisions between Marine Wildlife and Boats

Collisons between wildlife and vehicles threaten many species, and can lead to human loss of life, injuries, and loss of property. USGS is developing models to help evaluate the effectiveness of wildlife protection zones and optimize the design of these protected areas. 

Date published: March 5, 2019
Status: Active

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Flood and Storm Tracker (FaST)

Storm-related flooding can lead to the potential spread of nonindigenous (or non-native) aquatic species into waterways they have not been seen in before. The USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program has developed an innovative mapping tool to help natural resource managers with post-storm nonindigenous aquatic species detection and assessment efforts. 

Date published: March 5, 2019
Status: Active

Adaptive Harvest Management of European Geese

Pink-footed geese in Svalbard are a highly valued resource, but their increasing population causes conflicts with agricultural needs. USGS is devloping population models to help inform management of optimal harvest strategies. 

Date published: March 4, 2019
Status: Active

Natural Resource Damage and Assessment (NRDA) Program Monitoring and Adaptive Management

State and Federal agencies are working together to assess the damage caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and to determine appropriate restoration actions to restore natural resources, ecological services, and recreational services injured or lost due to the incident. 

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

A Structured Decision-Making Framework for Controlling, Monitoring, and Containment of Invasive Species through Trapping: An Application to the Argentine Black and White Tegu

USGS is applying decision analysis to identify cost-effective methods for controlling invasive species like the Argentine black and white tegu.

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Climate Change Adaptation for Coastal National Wildlife Refuges

National Wildlife Refuges provide habitat for important fish and wildlife species and services that benefit coastal communities, like storm-surge protection. USGS scientists are helping coastal refuges plan for and adapt to sea-level rise. 

Date published: February 28, 2019
Status: Active

Decision Analysis to Help Improve the Effectiveness of Invasive Plants Management

Melaleuca is an invasive tree that is highly problematic in the Everglades, threatening native wildlife and habitat. USGS is helping to improve management strategies for the invasive plant. 

Date published: February 27, 2019
Status: Active

Habitat Modeling for the Endangered Everglades Snail Kite and Its Prey

Joint Ecosystem Modeling (JEM) provides real-time habitat suitability models for species of interest in Everglades restoration planning, including the federally endangered Everglades snail kite.