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Graphic depicting 350 earthquakes that were located at Mount St. Helens between February 1 to June 17, 2024
Graphic depicting 350 earthquakes that were located at Mount St. Helens between February 1 to June 17, 2024
Graphic depicting 350 earthquakes that were located at Mount St. Helens between February 1 to June 17, 2024
Graphic depicting 350 earthquakes that were located at Mount St. Helens between February 1 to June 17, 2024

From February 1 to June 17, 2024, approximately 350 earthquakes were located at Mount St. Helens by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network. Over 95% of the earthquakes were less than a magnitude 1.0 and too small to be felt at the surface. The number of earthquakes located per week appears to have reached a peak in early June, at 38 events per week. USGS graphic.

From February 1 to June 17, 2024, approximately 350 earthquakes were located at Mount St. Helens by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network. Over 95% of the earthquakes were less than a magnitude 1.0 and too small to be felt at the surface. The number of earthquakes located per week appears to have reached a peak in early June, at 38 events per week. USGS graphic.

Comparison of February-June 2024 seismicity to previous seismic swarms (1987-2004).
Comparison of February-June 2024 seismicity to previous seismic swarms (1987-2004).
Comparison of February-June 2024 seismicity to previous seismic swarms (1987-2004).
Comparison of February-June 2024 seismicity to previous seismic swarms (1987-2004).

Comparison of February-June 2024 seismicity to previous seismic swarms (1987-2004). Upper left: Map of Mount St. Helens with a grayscale representing a digital elevation model. Earthquakes interpreted as recharge between 1987 and 2004 are plotted as a heatmap of earthquake density.

Comparison of February-June 2024 seismicity to previous seismic swarms (1987-2004). Upper left: Map of Mount St. Helens with a grayscale representing a digital elevation model. Earthquakes interpreted as recharge between 1987 and 2004 are plotted as a heatmap of earthquake density.

Earthquakes located at Mount St. Helens from 2008-2024, a non-eruptive period.
Earthquakes located at Mount St. Helens from 2008-2024, a non-eruptive period.
Earthquakes located at Mount St. Helens from 2008-2024, a non-eruptive period.
Earthquakes located at Mount St. Helens from 2008-2024, a non-eruptive period.

Earthquakes located at Mount St. Helens from 2008-2024, a non-eruptive period. This activity is consistent with normal, background levels. Top: Earthquake events located per week. The orange color at the far right denotes earthquakes from February to June 2024. Bottom: Earthquake depths below sea level (bsl) in kilometers.

Earthquakes located at Mount St. Helens from 2008-2024, a non-eruptive period. This activity is consistent with normal, background levels. Top: Earthquake events located per week. The orange color at the far right denotes earthquakes from February to June 2024. Bottom: Earthquake depths below sea level (bsl) in kilometers.

postfire debris flows
Postfire debris flows
Postfire debris flows
Postfire debris flows

Fast-moving, highly destructive debris flows triggered by intense rainfall are one of the most dangerous post-fire hazards. The risk of floods and debris flows after fires increases due to vegetation loss and soil exposure. Cases of sudden and deadly debris flow are well documented along the western United States, particularly in Southern California.

Fast-moving, highly destructive debris flows triggered by intense rainfall are one of the most dangerous post-fire hazards. The risk of floods and debris flows after fires increases due to vegetation loss and soil exposure. Cases of sudden and deadly debris flow are well documented along the western United States, particularly in Southern California.

wildfire stats
Wildfire Stats
Wildfire Stats
Wildfire Stats

USGS fire science informs land, water, and emergency management decisions. Each year tens of thousands of wildfires cause billions of dollars of damage. 

USGS fire science informs land, water, and emergency management decisions. Each year tens of thousands of wildfires cause billions of dollars of damage. 

wildfire temperatures
How Hot Are Wildfires?
How Hot Are Wildfires?
How Hot Are Wildfires?

How hot do wildfires get? 

  • 570 F degrees - TEMPERATURE AT WHICH WOOD WILL BURST INTO FLAMES
  • 2,200 F degrees - TEMPERATURE WILDFIRES COULD REACH IN EXTREME CONDITIONS

How hot do wildfires get? 

  • 570 F degrees - TEMPERATURE AT WHICH WOOD WILL BURST INTO FLAMES
  • 2,200 F degrees - TEMPERATURE WILDFIRES COULD REACH IN EXTREME CONDITIONS

Videos

Elwha River Mouth flyover and timelapse cover image Elwha River Mouth virtual flyover and timelapse
Elwha River Mouth virtual flyover and timelapse
Elwha River Mouth virtual flyover and timelapse

This PlaneCam video was produced by developing animation tracklines in ArcGlobe, using imagery from PlaneCam flights.

This PlaneCam video was produced by developing animation tracklines in ArcGlobe, using imagery from PlaneCam flights.

Cover image for timelapse at Lake Mills Delta, Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Lake Mills Delta timelapse
Lake Mills Delta timelapse
Lake Mills Delta timelapse

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Cover image for timelapse at the Elwha River Mouth on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Elwha River Mouth timelapse
Elwha River Mouth timelapse
Elwha River Mouth timelapse

This PlaneCam video was produced by developing animation tracklines in ArcGlobe, using imagery from PlaneCam flights.

This PlaneCam video was produced by developing animation tracklines in ArcGlobe, using imagery from PlaneCam flights.

Cover image for timelapse at Glines Canyon Dam, Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Glines Canyon Dam timelapse
Glines Canyon Dam timelapse
Glines Canyon Dam timelapse

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Cover image for timelapse at Lake Aldwell Delta, Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Lake Aldwell Delta timelapse
Lake Aldwell Delta timelapse
Lake Aldwell Delta timelapse

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Cover image for timelapse at Lower Lake Aldwell, Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Lower Lake Aldwell timelapse
Lower Lake Aldwell timelapse
Lower Lake Aldwell timelapse

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Audio

Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Where they were
Landers Rupture — Where they were
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Where they were

USGS scientists remember where they were during the 1992 Landers earthquake in Southern California

USGS scientists remember where they were during the 1992 Landers earthquake in Southern California

Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Sue on what it felt like
Landers Rupture — Sue on what it felt like
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Sue on what it felt like

USGS seismologist Susan Hough recalls what the 1992 Landers earthquake felt like from Pasadena, CA. 

USGS seismologist Susan Hough recalls what the 1992 Landers earthquake felt like from Pasadena, CA. 

Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Andy on using satellite data
Landers Rupture — Andy on using satellite data
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Andy on using satellite data

USGS seismologist Andrew Michael talks about the remote location of the 1992 Landers earthquake and how researchers were able to use satellite data to better see the quake’s impacts.

USGS seismologist Andrew Michael talks about the remote location of the 1992 Landers earthquake and how researchers were able to use satellite data to better see the quake’s impacts.

Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Sue on her role after the earthquake and seismic monitoring in Southern CA
Landers Rupture — Sue on her role after the earthquake and seismic monitoring in Southern CA
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Sue on her role after the earthquake and seismic monitoring in Southern CA

USGS seismologist Susan Hough talks about her role following the 1992 Landers earthquake and seismic monitoring stations in Southern California.

USGS seismologist Susan Hough talks about her role following the 1992 Landers earthquake and seismic monitoring stations in Southern California.

Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Scott on what it looked like
Landers Rupture — Scott on what it looked like
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Scott on what it looked like

USGS field technician Scott Lydeen recalls what the aftermath of the 1992 Landers earthquake looked like.

USGS field technician Scott Lydeen recalls what the aftermath of the 1992 Landers earthquake looked like.

Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Sue on how monitoring networks evolved
Landers Rupture — Sue on how monitoring networks evolved
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers rupture
Landers Rupture — Sue on how monitoring networks evolved

USGS seismologist Susan Hough described the Southern California Seismic Network and how it was used for the 1992 Landers earthquake.

USGS seismologist Susan Hough described the Southern California Seismic Network and how it was used for the 1992 Landers earthquake.

Webcams

Zoomed-in view of a small section of the beach from Madeira Beach camera 2 shows tourists walking along the beach
Most recent snapshot at Madeira Beach, Florida, Camera 2
Most recent snapshot at Madeira Beach, Florida, Camera 2
Most recent snapshot at Madeira Beach, Florida, Camera 2

Most recent snapshot from Camera 2 at Madeira Beach, Florida. Camera hosted by Shoreline Island Resort.

Most recent snapshot from Camera 2 at Madeira Beach, Florida. Camera hosted by Shoreline Island Resort.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 2 bright image
Nuvuk video camera 2 bright image
Nuvuk video camera 2 bright image

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 1 dark image
Nuvuk video camera 1 dark image
Nuvuk video camera 1 dark image

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 2 dark image
Nuvuk video camera 2 dark image
Nuvuk video camera 2 dark image

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 2 snapshop
Nuvuk video camera 2 snapshop
Nuvuk video camera 2 snapshop

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.