Volcano Hazards Program Office

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The fissure 8 lava flows of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption meet the ocean at Pohoiki Bay
March 4, 2021

March 4 overflight of Kīlauea summit and East Rift Zone

The fissure 8 lava flows of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption meet the ocean at Pohoiki Bay, in the lower left corner of this image. Wave erosion of the 2018 lava flows along the coast contributes to sand accumulation that forms a beach at Pohoiki Bay. USGS image by K. Mulliken on March 4, 2021.

Subtle steaming was visible at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō during HVO's overflight of Kīlauea on March 4, 2021
March 4, 2021

March 4 overflight of Kīlauea summit and East Rift Zone

Subtle steaming was visible at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō during HVO's overflight of Kīlauea on March 4, 2021. Steam is normally visible as the vent—which was active for more than 35 years—continues to cool, following the 2018 Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō collapse. The brown-colored tephra deposits (right) are from the high-fountaining phases early in the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō eruption, whereas the silver-grey lava

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 Aerial view of Kīlauea caldera, within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park
March 4, 2021

March 4 overflight of Kīlauea summit and East Rift Zone

Another view of Kīlauea caldera, within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Ha‘akulamanu (Sulphur Banks) trail is visible in the foreground. The gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u in the background marks where the current eruption is taking place. Uēkahuna—the summit of Kīlauea—is visible in the upper right portion of the image. USGS image by K. Mulliken on March 4, 2021.

Color map of lava lake depth
March 4, 2021

Lava Lake Depth March 4th

Data from a Kīlauea summit helicopter overflight on March 4th allowed for the calculation of the depth of the lava in Halema‘uma‘u crater. The deepest parts of the lake (darkest reds) exceed 200 meters (650 feet). Different-colored lines in Halema‘uma‘u show the perimeter of the lava lake and the vents over the course of the eruption. Rise of the lava lake has slowed in

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Maps showing lava lake growth
March 4, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruption sequence Digital Elevation Models

HVO uses regular Kīlauea summit helicopter overflights of Halema‘uma‘u crater to create digital elevation models (DEMs) of the crater. The DEMs show changes in the crater over time and can be used to estimate erupted volume, eruption rate, and map features of interest. In this sequence of DEMs, the rise of the lava lake can be clearly tracked as well as the movement of the

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March 4, 2021

East Rift Zone overflight (March 4, 2021)

A routine helicopter overflight of Kīlauea's East Rift Zone allowed Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists to conduct an updated visual and thermal survey. This video is shown at 5x speed, and moves from west to east. At the western end of the region affected during the 2018 eruption, steaming remains in residential areas west of Highway 130. The video then enters Leilani

March 4, 2021

Kīlauea Lower East Rift Zone Overflight—Lava Delta (March 4, 2021)

A routine helicopter overflight of the East Rift Zone of Kīlauea on March 4, 2021, allowed HVO geologists to conduct an updated visual and thermal survey. This video is shown at 5x speed and follows the new coastline created during the 2018 eruption in the Kapoho area. Lava along the shoreline continues to slowly erode, with small beaches forming in embayment's. 
 

March 4, 2021

Kīlauea East Rift Zone Overflight (March, 4, 2021)

A routine helicopter overflight of Kīlauea's East Rift Zone allowed Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists to conduct an updated visual and thermal survey. This video is shown at 2x speed and circles Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, the vent region for the East Rift Zone eruption between 1983 and 2018. No major changes were observed in Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. The bottom of the crater was more shallow

View of the Kīlauea summit lava lake taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u
March 3, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 3, 2021

View of the Kīlauea summit lava lake taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u at 12:21 p.m. HST on March 3, 2021. The western portion of the lava lake is active with lava being fed from the west vent. The eastern surface of the lava lake remains crusted over. SO2 emission rates are elevated at approximately 1000 t/d, as measured on March 3, 2021. USGS photo taken

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The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active
March 2, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 3, 2021

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active. Lava is entering the lake at a small inlet along the western lake margin, at the site of the western fissure. Active surface lava remains limited to the western portion of the lake. Scattered crustal foundering and small overflows were present on Tuesday, March 2, 2021. USGS photo by M. Patrick

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The western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u remains active, with incandescence visible in two small vent openings
March 2, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 3, 2021

The western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u remains active, with incandescence visible in two small vent openings. The northeastern incandescent vent opening (right) has a narrow, drained lava channel extending down the flank of the cone. USGS photo taken by M. Patrick on March 2, 2021.

Close-up view of the western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u, showing the incandescent lava upwelling at the inlet
March 2, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 3, 2021

Another close-up view of the western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u, showing the incandescent lava upwelling at the inlet zone along the western lake margin. This photo was taken on March 2, 2021, in an area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to the public due to safety reasons. USGS photo by M. Patrick.