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Science

At EROS, we study land change and how it impacts ecosystems, economics, and everyday life. Our research focuses on six areas: Integrated Land Change Monitoring; Vegetation, Water and Climate Dynamics; Human Health and Food Security; Remote Sensing Research and Development; Wildland Fire Science; and Terrain Monitoring and Modeling.

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Integrated Land Change Monitoring

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Vegetation, Water and Climate Dynamics

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Human Health and Food Security

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Remote Sensing Research and Development

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Wildland Fire Science

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Terrain Monitoring and Modeling

Education

Careers at the U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) EROS Center is government-owned/directed and contractor-operated. The work of EROS is carried out through mission-support contracts with industry.

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Careers at the U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) EROS Center is government-owned/directed and contractor-operated. The work of EROS is carried out through mission-support contracts with industry.

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The Don Lee Kulow Memorial Library

The Don Lee Kulow Memorial Library (EROS Library) provides support for staff at EROS. Expansive information on remote sensing, environmental sciences, systems engineering, and other topics is available.

 

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The Don Lee Kulow Memorial Library

The Don Lee Kulow Memorial Library (EROS Library) provides support for staff at EROS. Expansive information on remote sensing, environmental sciences, systems engineering, and other topics is available.

 

Learn More

Concept to Reality USGS Land Change Monitoring Assessment and Projection Pushes Boundaries

More than a decade ago, Tom Loveland sat down to sketch out a few thoughts on land change and the Landsat archive.

The archive was and remains rich with history, adding new observations of the entire planet every eight days. But at that point, Landsat-based land change research was about comparing points in time – this year versus five years ago, to 10 years ago, and so on.

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Concept to Reality USGS Land Change Monitoring Assessment and Projection Pushes Boundaries

More than a decade ago, Tom Loveland sat down to sketch out a few thoughts on land change and the Landsat archive.

The archive was and remains rich with history, adding new observations of the entire planet every eight days. But at that point, Landsat-based land change research was about comparing points in time – this year versus five years ago, to 10 years ago, and so on.

Learn More