New Jersey Water Science Center

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Welcome! Since 1903, the New Jersey Water Science Center has been collecting high-quality hydrologic data and conducting unbiased water-science research to address the water-resource priorities of the Nation, global trends and support statewide water-resource infrastructure and management needs.

Real-time data

Streamflow || Groundwater || Water Quality || Weather || Tide 

New Jersey Current Water Conditions

New Jersey Current Water Conditions

Real-time New Jersey Streamflow, Groundwater, and Water-quality conditions available through an interactive map application.

Water Data Dashboard

Water Science In New Jersey

Water Science In New Jersey

New Jersey WSC science Projects

NJWSC Sciences

News

Date published: July 12, 2019

USGS Studies Water Quality and Harmful Algal Bloom on Lake Hopatcong, New Jersey

On July 9, USGS scientists deployed an advanced monitoring buoy to study water-quality conditions and a harmful algal bloom-HAB-recently detected in Lake Hopatcong, New Jersey. 

Date published: June 14, 2019

Modeling Management Actions Helps Researchers Pinpoint the Main Culprit of Wood Frog Declines

Amphibian decline is a global conservation crisis driven by multiple interacting stressors, which often act at a local scale with global implications.

Date published: April 23, 2019

Africa Groundwater Program

USGS International study promotes groundwater sustainability using innovative science and technology transfer

Publications

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Year Published: 2019

Use of Set Blanks in Reporting Pesticide Results at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory, 2001–15

Executive SummaryBackground.—Pesticide results from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) are used for water-quality assessments by many agencies and organizations. The USGS is committed to providing data of the highest possible quality to the consumers of its data. A cooperator’s inquiries about specific...

Medalie, Laura; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Foreman, William T.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Riskin, Melissa L.
Medalie, L., Sandstrom, M.W., Toccalino, P.L., Foreman, W.T., ReVello, R.C., Bexfield, L.M., and Riskin, M.L., 2019, Use of set blanks in reporting pesticide results at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory, 2001–15: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2019–5055, 147 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20195055.

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Year Published: 2019

Predictive analysis using chemical-gene interaction networks consistent with observed endocrine activity and mutagenicity of U.S. streams

In a recent U.S. Geological Survey/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study assessing >700 organic compounds in 38 streams, in vitro assays indicated generally low estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid receptor activities, but identified 13 surface waters with 17β estradiol equivalent (E2Eq) activities greater than the 1 ng/L level of...

Berninger, Jason P.; DeMarini, David M.; Warren, Sarah H.; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Wilson, Vickie S.; Conley, Justin M.; Armstrong, Mikayla D.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Reilly, Timothy J.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Bradley, Paul M.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.
Berninger, J.P., D.M. DeMarini, S.H. Warren, J.E. Simmons, V.S. Wilson, J.M. Conley, M.S. Armstrong, L.R. Iwanowicz, D.W. Kolpin, K.M. Kuivila, T.J. Reilly, K.M. Romanok, D.A. Villeneuve, and P.M. Bradley. 2019. Predictive analysis using chemical-gene interaction networks consistent with observed endocrine activity and mutagenicity of U.S. streams. Environmental Science and Technology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b02990

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Year Published: 2019

Managing the trifecta of disease, climate, and contaminants: Searching for robust choices under multiple sources of uncertainty

Wood frogs, like other amphibian species worldwide, are experiencing population declines due to multiple stressors. In the northeastern United States, wood frog declines are thought to result from a reduction in successful metamorphosis in part due to climate change, disease (specifically ranavirus) and contaminant exposure. The presence of...

Smalling, Kelly; Eagles-Smith, Collin; Katz, Rachel A.; Grant, Evan