Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Capabilities

The USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center conducts integrated mapping of the coastal and ocean environment to define hazards and sediment processes, to support habitat and resource management, and to monitor change. PCMSC is an innovator in mapping, laboratory analyses, and field techniques, whose expertise is sought by other governmental agencies, educational institutions, and private companies. In turn, we seek collaborative research and development opportunities with similar groups to continually correct and perfect the data collection tools, analytical techniques, and technologies utilized in our coastal and ocean studies.

PCMSC Marine Facility

PCMSC Marine Facility

“MarFac” provides engineering, mechanical, and electronics expertise for our field operations.

MarFac

Field Equipment

Field Equipment

Learn about the wide array of field equipment and capabilities at the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center Marine Facility.

MarFac Equipment

Laboratories

Laboratories

Learn all about our state-of-the-art laboratories at the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz, California.

Laboratories
Filter Total Items: 60
Date published: May 20, 2020
Status: Active

usSEABED

usSEABED is the collaborative product of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Colorado, and other partners, and provides integrated data from small and large marine research efforts by many entities—federal and state agencies, local authorities, universities, as well as private and public consortiums.

Date published: May 13, 2020
Status: Active

GOMEX box corer

PCMSC uses the GOMEX box corer for collecting soft, deep-water sediment samples.

Date published: November 29, 2019
Status: Completed

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Whidbey Island

From May of 2018 through November of 2019, USGS scientists collected imagery from video cameras overlooking the coast along a beach on Whidbey Island, Island County at the northern boundary of Puget Sound in western Washington.

    Contacts: Eric Grossman
    Date published: October 17, 2019
    Status: Active

    CoSMoS 3.1: Central California

    CoSMoS v3.1 for central California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms)

    Date published: July 22, 2019
    Status: Completed

    Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Isla Verde

    USGS scientists installed video cameras atop a building and oceanographic instruments off San Juan, Puerto Rico, to better understand how waves move across coral reefs and cause flooding on tropical shorelines.

    Date published: April 1, 2019
    Status: Completed

    Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Barter Island, Alaska

    For a short study period, two video cameras overlooked the coast from atop the coastal bluff of Barter Island in northern Alaska. The purpose was to observe and quantify coastal processes such as wave run-up, development of rip channels, bluff erosion, and movement of sandbars and ice floes.

    Date published: October 30, 2018
    Status: Active

    California Seafloor Mapping Program data collection

    Here we describe the data collection methods and techniques of the California Seaflor Mapping Program: mapping, video and photography ground-truthing, and seismic profiling data collection.

    Date published: October 30, 2018
    Status: Active

    California Seafloor Mapping Program map-set production

    USGS and the California Ocean Protection Council (COPC) are supporting development of peer-reviewed map sets for California’s mainland State Waters.

    Date published: October 27, 2018
    Status: Active

    Global Geoengineering Research

    The Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center geotechnical group investigates the causes of ground deformation and ground failure as a result of earthquakes, storms, and wave action

    Contacts: Robert Kayen
    Date published: January 1, 2005
    Status: Completed

    “Flying Eyeball” Measures Grand Canyon Sand

    Information about the  USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center's development of an instrument called the "flying eyeball" to measure river sand, from 1993-2004.

    Date published: January 1, 2004
    Status: Completed

    Big Sur Coastal Landslides

    Information about USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center studies on coastal landslides in the Big Sur area