Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Hazards

Coastal and Offshore Hazards: USGS makes detailed seafloor maps of offshore geology to identify faults and underwater landslides. The results help coastal communities become more resilient to marine geologic hazards that include earthquakes and tsunamis. We also develop statistical and computer models of earthquake and tsunami recurrence to help manage risk.

Filter Total Items: 58
Date published: October 22, 2020
Status: Active

EXPRESS: Expanding Pacific Research and Exploration of Submerged Systems

EXPRESS is a multi-year, multi-institution cooperative research campaign in deep sea areas of California, Oregon, and Washington, including the continental shelf and slope. EXPRESS data and information are intended to guide wise use of living marine resources and habitats, inform ocean energy and mineral resource decisions, and improve offshore hazard assessments.

Read the June 11, 2020...

Date published: October 8, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Santa Cruz Beaches

Two video cameras atop the Dream Inn hotel in Santa Cruz, California, overlook the coast in northern Monterey Bay. One camera looks eastward over Santa Cruz Main Beach and boardwalk, while the other looks southward over Cowells Beach.

Date published: October 8, 2020
Status: Active

Featured Photos and Videos

Keep watching this page for more photos from our scientists!

Contacts: Laura Torresan
Date published: October 8, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Tres Palmas

Four video cameras look westward over the coast and the coral reef at Tres Palmas in Rincón, on the west coast of Puerto Rico. Two cameras look out at the horizon and over the ocean for the mid-field view; one camera offers a zoomed-in, far-field view overlooking the reef and out to the island of Desecheo, a U.S. National Wildlife Refuge; and another camera focuses on the beach.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Miguel Canals-Silander, Patricia Chardon Maldonado
Date published: September 30, 2020
Status: Active

Cascadia Subduction Zone Marine Geohazards

Societal Issue: Uncertainty related to rupture extent, slip distribution, and recurrence of past subduction megathrust earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest (northern CA, OR, WA, and southern BC) leads to ambiguity in earthquake and tsunami hazard assessments and hinders our ability to prepare for future events.

Date published: September 17, 2020
Status: Completed

USGS Scientists in Samoa and American Samoa Studying Impacts of Tsunami in 2009

On September 29, 2009, an M 8.1 earthquake in the Samoa Islands region of the South Pacific Ocean caused a tsunami that resulted in 100's of lost lives. A rapid-response team of USGS scientists traveled to the Samoa Islands in October-November 2009 to collect time-sensitive data that would have been quickly...

Contacts: Bruce Jaffe
Date published: August 20, 2020
Status: Completed

2019 Geophysical surveys and sediment coring in southern Cascadia (northern California)

Objectives: The sediment sampling and geophysical surveys were designed to address questions regarding tectonic activity and sediment dispersal patterns across the margin. Survey tracks and sampling sites were targeted to investigate the Eel River forearc basin sedimentation history and the sources and pathways of sediment gravity flows, both of which provide context for...

Contacts: Jenna C Hill
Date published: August 19, 2020
Status: Completed

2019 Seafloor Geodesy cruise

Objectives: Constrain the rate and spatial distribution of locking (stress accumulation) along the megathrust offshore Cascadia with seafloor geodetic instrument arrays that operate using indirect-path acoustic ranging methods with Global Navigation Satellite System positioning (GNSS-A) (Figure 1)

This survey is part of the USGS project, “...

Contacts: Janet Watt
Date published: August 19, 2020
Status: Completed

2019 USGS-NOAA Multibeam Bathymetry

Objectives: Fill in critical baseline bathymetric mapping gaps along the mid- to upper-slope.

These surveys are part of the USGS project, “Cascadia Subduction Zone Marine Geohazards.”

Contacts: Peter Dartnell
Date published: August 19, 2020
Status: Completed

2019 Geophysical surveys and instrumented tripod deployment in and around Astoria Canyon

Objectives: Examine the processes associated with sediment storage and remobilization in and around Astoria Canyon to understand the processes that lead to turbidity flows.

These surveys are part of the USGS project, “Cascadia Subduction Zone Marine Geohazards.”

Contacts: Jenna C Hill
Date published: August 19, 2020
Status: Active

Remote Sensing Coastal Change

We use remote-sensing technologies—such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry, and lidar (laser-based surveying)—to measure coastal change along U.S. shorelines.

Date published: August 18, 2020
Status: Completed

2019 Regional geophysical surveys of northern and central Cascadia (offshore Washington and Oregon)

Objectives: Systematic characterization of upper plate structure and offshore geohazards in northern Cascadia.

These surveys are part of the USGS project, “Cascadia Subduction Zone Marine Geohazards.”

Contacts: Janet Watt