Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Capabilities

We use remote-sensing technologies—such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, video imagery, and lidar (laser-based surveying)—to measure coastal change along U.S. shorelines. We also conduct integrated mapping of the coastal and marine environment to define offshore hazards and sediment processes, support habitat and resource management, and monitor change. Learn more about our capabilities at the links here.

Filter Total Items: 19
Date published: December 9, 2019
Status: Active

Featured Photos and Videos

Keep watching this page for more photos from our scientists!

Contacts: Laura Torresan
Date published: November 8, 2019
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Whidbey Island

Video cameras overlook the coast along a beach on Whidbey Island, Island County at the northern boundary of Puget Sound in western Washington.

    Contacts: Eric Grossman
    Date published: October 17, 2019
    Status: Active

    CoSMoS 3.1: Central California

    CoSMoS v3.1 for central California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms)

    Date published: October 17, 2019
    Status: Active

    Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS)

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions of storm-induced coastal flooding, erosion, and cliff failures over large geographic scales. CoSMoS was developed for hindcast studies, operational applications and future climate scenarios to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety...

    Date published: September 19, 2019
    Status: Active

    Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Sunset State Beach

    Two video cameras overlook the coast at Sunset State Beach in Watsonville, California. Camera 1 looks northwest while Camera 2 looks north. The cameras are part of the Remote Sensing Coastal Change project.

    Date published: August 28, 2019
    Status: Active

    Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Unalakleet

    Two video cameras overlook the coast from atop a windmill tower in Unalakleet, Alaska where they look westward over Norton Sound.

    Date published: July 25, 2019
    Status: Active

    Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Santa Cruz Beaches

    Two video cameras atop the Dream Inn hotel in Santa Cruz, California, overlook the coast in northern Monterey Bay. One camera looks eastward over Santa Cruz Main Beach and boardwalk, while the other looks southward over Cowells Beach. The cameras are part of the Remote Sensing Coastal Change project.

    Date published: July 22, 2019
    Status: Active

    Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Tres Palmas

    Four video cameras look westward over the coast and the coral reef at Tres Palmas in Rincón, on the west coast of Puerto Rico. Two cameras look out at the horizon and over the ocean for the mid-field view; one camera offers a zoomed-in, far-field view overlooking the reef and out to the island of Desecheo, a U.S. National Wildlife Refuge; and another camera focuses on the beach.

    Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, Miguel Canals-Silander, Patricia Chardon Maldonado
    Date published: June 3, 2019
    Status: Active

    PCMSC Marine Facility (Marfac)

    Marfac is the operational arm of the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center. The Marine Facility staff provides mechanical and electronics expertise for field operations along the coast, in the nearshore environment, and in the deeper waters of the ocean.

    Contacts: Timothy Elfers
    Date published: October 30, 2018
    Status: Active

    California Seafloor Mapping Program data collection

    Here we describe the data collection methods and techniques of the California Seaflor Mapping Program: mapping, video and photography ground-truthing, and seismic profiling data collection.

    Date published: October 30, 2018
    Status: Active

    California Seafloor Mapping Program map-set production

    USGS and the California Ocean Protection Council (COPC) are supporting development of peer-reviewed map sets for California’s mainland State Waters.

    Date published: October 27, 2018
    Status: Active

    Global Geoengineering Research

    Ground Deformation and Failure

    The Coastal and Marine Geology geotechnical group investigates the causes of ground deformation and ground failure as a result of earthquakes, storms, and wave action. The coastal urban regions of the Pacific margin of the United States are growing rapidly, putting increasing demands on coastal infrastructure and lifelines, such as...

    Contacts: Robert Kayen