Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Ocean Ecosystems

Filter Total Items: 19
Date published: September 7, 2021
Status: Active

The Value of U.S. Coral Reefs for Risk Reduction

Summary of the report, “Rigorously valuing the role of U.S. coral reefs in coastal hazard risk reduction”

    Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Michael Beck
    Date published: September 2, 2021
    Status: Active

    Ecosystems: EXPRESS

    The continental shelf and slope offshore California, Oregon, and Washington are home to deep-sea corals, chemosynthetic communities, and other sensitive habitats that could be impacted by the development of energy and mineral resources. The EXPRESS (Expanding Pacific Research and Exploration of Submerged Systems) campaign will map and characterize these special areas to help guide ocean...

    Date published: August 26, 2021
    Status: Active

    Climate Change and Land-use Histories

    We are developing new and unique oceanographic and environmental archives from coral skeleton records to better understand the compounding effects of land-use and environmental change on coral reef health.

    Contacts: Nancy Prouty
    Date published: August 26, 2021
    Status: Active

    Reef Resource Assessments - Planning for the Future

    We are mapping and assessing all of the important geologic and oceanographic factors to identify those coral reefs most at risk and those reefs that are potentially the most resilient and the most likely to recover from natural and human-driven impacts.

    Date published: August 23, 2021
    Status: Active

    EXPRESS: Expanding Pacific Research and Exploration of Submerged Systems

    EXPRESS is a multi-year, multi-institution cooperative research campaign in deep sea areas of California, Oregon, and Washington, including the continental shelf and slope. EXPRESS data and information are intended to guide wise use of living marine resources and habitats, inform ocean energy and mineral resource decisions, and improve offshore hazard assessments.

    Date published: June 25, 2021
    Status: Active

    Coral Reef Project: Puerto Rico

    To better understand how waves move across coral reefs and cause flooding on tropical shorelines, USGS scientists have installed video cameras and oceanographic instruments off San Juan and Rincón, Puerto Rico. Their work is part of a study funded by USGS after Hurricanes Irma and María. The offshore instruments measure wave heights and speeds; the onshore video cameras show where waves break...

    Date published: June 25, 2021
    Status: Active

    Reef Hydrodynamics and Sediment Processes

    The overall objective of this research effort is to better understand how circulation and sediment processes impact coral reefs and their adjacent coastlines.

    Date published: April 15, 2021
    Status: Active

    Coral Reef Project: Oʻahu

    As part of the Coral Reef Project, the USGS is working closely with other local groups to investigate poor water quality issues in Maunalua Bay on the southeast coast of Oʻahu.

    Date published: March 31, 2021
    Status: Active

    Marine Geomorphology, Evolution, and Habitats

    Seafloor resource managers and modelers need seafloor maps that can be combined in GIS, modeling, and statistical analysis environments and related successfully to biologic and oceanographic data. The Marine Geomorphology, Evolution, and Habitats Project encompasses mapping activities and the development of new mapping systems and methodologies. The emphasis is on the role of geologic...

    Date published: September 9, 2020
    Status: Active

    Hydrogeology and Reef Health

    We are conducting geophysical and geochemical research to address questions about coastal groundwater-to-reef flow and coral reef health, with the goal of informing management decisions related to planning and implementing activities in priority watershed-coral reef systems.