Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Ocean Resources

Filter Total Items: 20
Date published: September 30, 2021
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Unalakleet

USGS scientists installed two video cameras atop a windmill tower in Unalakleet, Alaska, pointing westward over Norton Sound, to observe and quantify coastal processes such as wave run-up, development of rip channels, bluff erosion, and movement of sandbars and ice floes.

Date published: August 23, 2021
Status: Active

EXPRESS: Expanding Pacific Research and Exploration of Submerged Systems

EXPRESS is a multi-year, multi-institution cooperative research campaign in deep sea areas of California, Oregon, and Washington, including the continental shelf and slope. EXPRESS data and information are intended to guide wise use of living marine resources and habitats, inform ocean energy and mineral resource decisions, and improve offshore hazard assessments.

Date published: July 30, 2021
Status: Active

Global Marine Mineral Resources

Researching mineral resources that occur within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone and areas beyond national jurisdictions.

Date published: June 10, 2021
Status: Active

California Sand Resource Assessment Project

The USGS is working in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the State of California Ocean Protection Council (OPC) to evaluate sand and gravel resources in Federal and State waters for potential use in future beach nourishment projects.  Prior to the leasing and development of outer continental shelf (OCS) sand resources for use in beach restoration or coastal...

Contacts: Jonathan Warrick, Mark Leung
Date published: April 15, 2021
Status: Active

Coral Reef Project: Oʻahu

As part of the Coral Reef Project, the USGS is working closely with other local groups to investigate poor water quality issues in Maunalua Bay on the southeast coast of Oʻahu.

Date published: March 31, 2021
Status: Active

Marine Geomorphology, Evolution, and Habitats

Seafloor resource managers and modelers need seafloor maps that can be combined in GIS, modeling, and statistical analysis environments and related successfully to biologic and oceanographic data. The Marine Geomorphology, Evolution, and Habitats Project encompasses mapping activities and the development of new mapping systems and methodologies. The emphasis is on the role of geologic...

Date published: November 18, 2020
Status: Active

Marine Minerals Laboratory

In the Marine Minerals Laboratory Suite at the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz, California, we have an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, rock saw, shatterbox, and petrographic microscopes. Here we do mineral identification and classification, molecular identification

Date published: August 31, 2020
Status: Active

California Seafloor Mapping Program

The California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) is a cooperative program to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat base map series for all of California's State waters. The California Ocean Protection Council (COPC) authorized funds to establish the CSMP in 2007 and assembled a team of experts from state and federal agencies, academia, and private industry to develop the...

Date published: May 20, 2020
Status: Active

usSEABED

usSEABED is the collaborative product of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Colorado, and other partners, and provides integrated data from small and large marine research efforts by many entities—federal and state agencies, local authorities, universities, as well as private and public consortiums.

Date published: June 19, 2019
Status: Active

Seeking the Seeps

From June 12 to July 3, 2019, the USGS sailed onboard Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor with several other partners, seeking methane seeps along the seafloor of several underwater canyons off the coast of Oregon and Washington. On this cruise, USGS scientists will seek to understand how much methane is coming out of these seeps, how it travels through the water column, and its...