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Ocean Resources

Learn more about our ocean-resources science and browse topics. 

Filter Total Items: 19

Global Marine Mineral Resources

Researching mineral resources that occur within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone and areas beyond national jurisdictions.
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Global Marine Mineral Resources

Researching mineral resources that occur within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone and areas beyond national jurisdictions.
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Marine Geomorphology, Evolution, and Habitats

Seafloor resource managers and modelers need seafloor maps that can be combined in GIS, modeling, and statistical analysis environments and related successfully to biologic and oceanographic data. The Marine Geomorphology, Evolution, and Habitats Project encompasses mapping activities and the development of new mapping systems and methodologies. The emphasis is on the role of geologic processes in...
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Marine Geomorphology, Evolution, and Habitats

Seafloor resource managers and modelers need seafloor maps that can be combined in GIS, modeling, and statistical analysis environments and related successfully to biologic and oceanographic data. The Marine Geomorphology, Evolution, and Habitats Project encompasses mapping activities and the development of new mapping systems and methodologies. The emphasis is on the role of geologic processes in...
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Sediment transport in submarine canyons

This research is part of the project, “Sediment Transport in Coastal Environments.”
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Sediment transport in submarine canyons

This research is part of the project, “Sediment Transport in Coastal Environments.”
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Coral Reef Project

Explore the fascinating undersea world of coral reefs. Learn how we map, monitor, and model coral reefs so we can better understand, protect, and preserve our Nation's reefs.
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Coral Reef Project

Explore the fascinating undersea world of coral reefs. Learn how we map, monitor, and model coral reefs so we can better understand, protect, and preserve our Nation's reefs.
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EXPRESS: Expanding Pacific Research and Exploration of Submerged Systems

EXPRESS is a multi-year, multi-institution cooperative research campaign in deep sea areas of California, Oregon, and Washington, including the continental shelf and slope. EXPRESS data and information are intended to guide wise use of living marine resources and habitats, inform ocean energy and mineral resource decisions, and improve offshore hazard assessments.
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EXPRESS: Expanding Pacific Research and Exploration of Submerged Systems

EXPRESS is a multi-year, multi-institution cooperative research campaign in deep sea areas of California, Oregon, and Washington, including the continental shelf and slope. EXPRESS data and information are intended to guide wise use of living marine resources and habitats, inform ocean energy and mineral resource decisions, and improve offshore hazard assessments.
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California Sand Resource Assessment Project

The USGS is working in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the State of California Ocean Protection Council (OPC) to evaluate sand and gravel resources in Federal and State waters for potential use in future beach nourishment projects. Prior to the leasing and development of outer continental shelf (OCS) sand resources for use in beach restoration or coastal...
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California Sand Resource Assessment Project

The USGS is working in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the State of California Ocean Protection Council (OPC) to evaluate sand and gravel resources in Federal and State waters for potential use in future beach nourishment projects. Prior to the leasing and development of outer continental shelf (OCS) sand resources for use in beach restoration or coastal...
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Coral Reef Project: Oʻahu

As part of the Coral Reef Project, the USGS is working closely with other local groups to investigate poor water quality issues in Maunalua Bay on the southeast coast of Oʻahu.
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Coral Reef Project: Oʻahu

As part of the Coral Reef Project, the USGS is working closely with other local groups to investigate poor water quality issues in Maunalua Bay on the southeast coast of Oʻahu.
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California Seafloor Mapping Program

The California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) is a cooperative program to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat base map series for all of California's State waters. The California Ocean Protection Council (COPC) authorized funds to establish the CSMP in 2007 and assembled a team of experts from state and federal agencies, academia, and private industry to develop the best...
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California Seafloor Mapping Program

The California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) is a cooperative program to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat base map series for all of California's State waters. The California Ocean Protection Council (COPC) authorized funds to establish the CSMP in 2007 and assembled a team of experts from state and federal agencies, academia, and private industry to develop the best...
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usSEABED

usSEABED is the collaborative product of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Colorado, and other partners, and provides integrated data from small and large marine research efforts by many entities—federal and state agencies, local authorities, universities, as well as private and public consortiums.
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usSEABED

usSEABED is the collaborative product of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Colorado, and other partners, and provides integrated data from small and large marine research efforts by many entities—federal and state agencies, local authorities, universities, as well as private and public consortiums.
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Seeking the Seeps

From June 12 to July 3, 2019, the USGS sailed onboard Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor with several other partners, seeking methane seeps along the seafloor of several underwater canyons off the coast of Oregon and Washington. On this cruise, USGS scientists will seek to understand how much methane is coming out of these seeps, how it travels through the water column, and its ultimate fate in...
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Seeking the Seeps

From June 12 to July 3, 2019, the USGS sailed onboard Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor with several other partners, seeking methane seeps along the seafloor of several underwater canyons off the coast of Oregon and Washington. On this cruise, USGS scientists will seek to understand how much methane is coming out of these seeps, how it travels through the water column, and its ultimate fate in...
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Delineating the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf

The United States has an interest in knowing the full extent of its continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles from shore (called the extended continental shelf, or ECS) so that it can better protect, manage, and use the seabed resources contained therein. The USGS is a member of the U.S. ECS Task Force, an interagency group that brings together a wide range of U.S. government agencies, including...
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Delineating the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf

The United States has an interest in knowing the full extent of its continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles from shore (called the extended continental shelf, or ECS) so that it can better protect, manage, and use the seabed resources contained therein. The USGS is a member of the U.S. ECS Task Force, an interagency group that brings together a wide range of U.S. government agencies, including...
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Seafloor Minerals

The seafloor contains deposits of minerals that we we use in everyday life such as copper, zinc, nickel, gold, silver, and phosphorus. These deposits occur as crusts on volcanic and other rocks and as nodules on abyssal plain sediment that are typically about 3 to 10 centimeters (1 to 4 inches) in diameter.
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Seafloor Minerals

The seafloor contains deposits of minerals that we we use in everyday life such as copper, zinc, nickel, gold, silver, and phosphorus. These deposits occur as crusts on volcanic and other rocks and as nodules on abyssal plain sediment that are typically about 3 to 10 centimeters (1 to 4 inches) in diameter.
Learn More