Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

eDNA

Filter Total Items: 10
Date published: May 29, 2020
Status: Active

Development of a Broad Microarray Technology to Survey for Aquatic Pathogens

Assessing Impacts of Emerging and Established Diseases to Aquatic Ecosystems

The need to maintain healthy aquatic ecosystems and sustain healthy communities is greatly recognized. Aquatic pathogens pose a...

Contacts: Diane Waller
Date published: May 29, 2020
Status: Active

Assessing Impacts of Emerging and Established Diseases to Aquatic Ecosystems

Native freshwater mussels play a critical role in aquatic environments and are considered “ecosystem engineers” and indicators of water quality by constantly filtering water. Populations of native freshwater mussels have declined in recent years, and this decline has been attributed to factors such as habitat degradation, pollution, and invasive species, among others. The importance of these...

Contacts: Diane Waller
Date published: April 3, 2020
Status: Active

Environmental DNA (eDNA) Data Management

The environmental DNA (eDNA) samples collected, processed, and sequenced by the Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) and partner agencies are being archived in a cloud-based database application. Consolidating eDNA data will significantly improve researchers and managers ability to visualize, analyze, and integrate sequence data as a monitoring and early detection system for...

Contacts: Chris M Merkes
Date published: June 5, 2019
Status: Active

Developing RNA Interference to Control Zebra Mussels

We aim to develop a control tool for eliminating zebra mussels that exploits natural gene regulation mechanisms (RNA-induced gene silencing; RNAi) to be specific to zebra mussels without non-target effects. In addition to the nuisance they pose, Pimentel et al. estimated that zebra mussels cost the U.S. economy over $1 billion annually. Zebra mussels are among the International Union...

Date published: July 23, 2018
Status: Active

BOR environmental DNA sampling for invasive mussels at USGS gages

As part of an ongoing project funded by the Bureau of Reclamation and lead by the Idaho Water Sciences Center (IDWSC) and Northern Rocky Mountain Research Center (NOROCK), the Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) will analyze environmental DNA samples collected at gage stations directly downstream of multiple reservoirs throughout the Columbia River Basin. The goal of this...

Contacts: Jon Amberg
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Increasing Efficiency and Throughput of eDNA

The results from this study will provide protocols for the collection, processing and analysis of environmental deoxyribonucleic acids (eDNA) samples for monitoring aquatic invasive species like Asian carp. These protocols have the potential to be used by fishery management agencies to monitor aquatic invasive species throughout the United States.

Contacts: Jon Amberg
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) density estimates using environmental DNA surveillance

Sea lampreys are a species that invaded the Great Lakes presumably following the improvements made to the Welland Canal in 1920. First reported in Lake Erie in 1921, sea lampreys subsequently spread rapidly to the upper Great Lakes and had an established spawning population in all of the upper Great Lakes by 1947 (Applegate 1950). Following their introduction, sea lamprey devastated the...

Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Developing a portable LAMP assay for detecting grass and black carp

Aquatic invasive species are a significant problem throughout the world. They cause millions of dollars in damages to industry, devastate natural ecosystems, and ruin outdoor recreational areas. Preventing their spread is imperative to preserving our natural resources. One potential pathway invasive fishes can spread is by harvesting and transporting baitfish. Often shipments of baitfish are...

Contacts: Chris M Merkes
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Correlating seasonal trends and occupancy of bigheaded carp eDNA to land use and stream characteristics

The results of this study will advance our understanding of environmental DNA (eDNA) and how eDNA signatures change as fish behavior changes over the course of the open water season.  This will further develop eDNA as an easy sampling method to collect information about invading populations or cryptic species that are difficult to capture so that resource managers can be given better...

Date published: May 8, 2017
Status: Active

Relationship between fish presence and abundance in Arizona standing waters measured through standard techniques and environmental DNA

The unpredictability of DNA degradation in the environment has plagued the ability of scientists to interpret environmental DNA (eDNA) data since the technique has been used for early detection of aquatic invasive species (AIS) such as silver and bighead carps (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) throughout the Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS), Des Plaines River,...