National Land Imaging Program

Home

Our Nation’s economic security and environmental vitality rely on continuous monitoring of the Earth’s continents, islands, and coastal regions in order to record, study, and understand land change at local, regional, and global scales. The USGS National Land Imaging (NLI) Program helps meet this need.

Image of the Week

Image of the Week

The Landsat Archive is the world’s longest continuously-collected record of the Earth’s surface. In mid-September, it notched another milestone by adding its nine millionth scene.

Landsat 9 Million

Landsat 9 Road to Launch

Landsat 9 Road to Launch

Launching in 2021, Landsat 9 is a partnership between NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey. Learn about the process of building Landsat 9 and how it will extend Landsat's unbroken record of our planet to over half a century.

Road to Launch

More to Explore

Follow these links to learn more about our remote sensing research partnerships, how to access and download data, our image collections, news articles, and more.

National Land Imaging Program Fact Sheet

Landsat Missions

NLI Highlights

Image Collections

Pecora Award

Find and Download Data

2020 Remote Sensing Satellite Compendium

News

Date published: September 28, 2020

Miglarese, Radiant Earth Advocate for Benefits of Open Training Datasets

Anne Hale Miglarese has a simple mantra when it comes to gathering and using training data for remote sensing.

Collect it once, the founder of the nonprofit Radiant Earth Foundation, says. Then use it many times.

Date published: September 11, 2020

Landsat Science Team Member: Satellites Can Play Greater Role in Informing Global Policies

It shouldn’t surprise anyone that scientists and engineers are constantly pushing the envelope to improve remote-sensing data and their utility, says Matt Hansen, a Landsat Science Team (LST) member and professor in the Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland in College Park.

Date published: September 4, 2020

New Edition of JACIE Remote Sensing Compendium Released for 2020

The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and its Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) partners have just released the second edition of the JACIE land remote sensing satellite compendium.

Publications

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

2020 Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation—Remote sensing satellite compendium

The Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) is a collaboration between five Federal agencies that are major users and producers of satellite land remote sensing data. In recent years, the JACIE group has observed ever-increasing numbers of remote sensing satellites being launched. This rapidly growing wave of new systems creates a need...

Ramaseri Chandra, Shankar N.; Christopherson, Jon B.; Casey, Kimberly A.
Ramaseri Chandra, S.N., Christopherson, J.B., and Casey, K.A., 2020, 2020 Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation—Remote sensing satellite compendium: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1468 (ver. 1.1, October 2020), 253 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1468. [Supersedes USGS Circular 1455.]

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2019

Economic valuation of landsat imagery

Landsat satellites have been operating since 1972, providing a continuous global record of the Earth’s land surface. The imagery is currently available at no cost through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). A previous USGS study estimated that Landsat imagery provided users an annual benefit of $2.19 billion in 2011, with U.S. users accounting for...

Straub, Crista L.; Koontz, Stephen R.; Loomis, John B.
Straub, C.L., Koontz, S.R., and Loomis, J.B., 2019, Economic valuation of Landsat imagery: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2019–1112, 13 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20191112.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2019

User needs for future Landsat missions

Landsat satellites have been operating since 1972, providing the longest continuous observation record of the Earth’s land surface. Over the past half century, the Landsat user community has grown exponentially, encompassing more diverse and evolving scientific research and operational uses. Understanding current and future user needs is crucial...

Wu, Zhuoting; Snyder, Gregory; Vadnais, Carolyn M.; Arora, Rohit; Babcock, Michael; Stensaas, Gregory L.; Doucette, Peter; Newman, Timothy