Water Resources

News

Browse the list below for news, announcements, events, project updates, and other information related to the Water Resources Mission Area.

Filter Total Items: 456
Date published: April 11, 2019

Salinity Cycles in Lower Colorado River Caused by Precipitation Patterns in Upper Basin

A new study shows that mysterious cycles in salinity in the lower Colorado River are a result of precipitation patterns in the headwaters of the upper basin more than a thousand river miles away. The salinity levels generally repeat about every 10 years.

Date published: April 8, 2019

Public Invitation: Learn the Latest on Your Water Resources in the Dakotas

News media and the public are invited to a free meeting about critical South Dakota-area water issues on Thursday, April 11, in Rapid City, South Dakota.

Date published: April 5, 2019

Media Advisory: USGS Crews Measure Record Flooding in Fargo

Reporters: Do you want to interview USGS scientists as they measure flooding in and near Fargo, North Dakota? Please contact Dave Ozman, Marisa Lubeck or Chris Laveau.

Date published: March 26, 2019

The USGS Response to Record Flooding in the Midwest Continues

USGS crews continue fieldwork in response to the ongoing flooding in the Midwest. Nearly 70 USGS gages in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota are above minor flood stage with more rain forecast in the coming days.

Date published: March 22, 2019

Online Tool Illustrates Groundwater Resources in Texas Panhandle

An interactive viewer to visualize groundwater resources in Gaines, Terry and Yoakum Counties, Texas, is now available from the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Llano Estacado Underground Water Conservation District, Sandy Land Underground Water Conservation District and South Plains Underground Water Conservation District. 

Date published: March 22, 2019

Media Advisory: USGS Crews Measure Record Flooding in Southeastern South Dakota

Reporters: Do you want to interview USGS scientists in the Sioux Falls area on Monday, March 25, or Tuesday, March 26, as they measure flooding? Please contact Jennifer LaVista, Marisa Lubeck or Chris Laveau.

Date published: March 21, 2019

Media Advisory: USGS Measures Record Flooding Across Nebraska

Reporters: Do you want to accompany a USGS field crew as they measure flood impacts? Please contact Marisa Lubeck or Jason Lambrecht to coordinate.

Date published: March 21, 2019

Massive changes over last 50 years in human influences that affect water quality

Some of the major human influences on water quality, in particular the ways we use land, water, and chemicals, have undergone dramatic changes over the last five decades, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Program. Patterns of urbanization, chemical use, and...

Date published: March 18, 2019

Mercury Concentrations in Lake Powell Higher in Side Canyons

Mercury concentrations within Lake Powell are highest in side canyons within the lower portion of the reservoir, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey report. This finding is part of a study to better understand why mercury concentrations in striped bass are higher in the lower part of the reservoir.

Date published: March 15, 2019

Domestic groundwater wells in the eastern and southeastern U.S. at risk of lead contamination

About one-third of more than 8,300 wells tested across the U.S. had groundwater with chemical characteristics that could cause lead, if present in plumbing, to leach into tap water at levels above the EPA Action Level, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Program. These...

Date published: March 11, 2019

President Proposes $983 Million FY20 Budget for USGS

Budget Focuses on Priorities Supporting American Energy Enterprise, National Security, and Natural Hazard Response Efforts

Date published: March 6, 2019

Pharmaceuticals and hormones few and at low concentrations in groundwater, USGS scientists find

The topic of pharmaceuticals and hormones in drinking water gets people’s attention, but if that drinking water is pumped from a well, those chemicals are less likely to be present, according to a new national study by the U.S. Geological Survey and published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.