Volcano Hazards Program Office

Multimedia

Filter Total Items: 3,287
April 13, 2021

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u Lava Lake Inlet (April 13, 2021)

This video shows the inlet along the western margin of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava stream was moving slowly but steadily, and was emerging beneath a portion of crust attached to the lake margin. The video is shown at 10x speed.
 

April 13, 2021

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u gas plume (April 13, 2021)

KPcam webcam on the flank of Mauna Loa looks south towards the summit of Kīlauea to monitor the gas plume from the active lava lake. This time-lapse video shows a typical day for the summit plume. Clear views in the night and morning show the low, ground-hugging plume carried to the southwest by the tradewinds. The plume is blocked from view by afternoon rain clouds. In

Lava continues to erupt from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit
April 9, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruptive activity on April 9, 2021

Lava continues to erupt from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. This photo of the vent and active western portion of the lava lake was taken around 3:00 p.m. HST from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater. USGS photo taken by K. Lynn on April 9, 2021.

Lava erupting from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater emerged from a second source closer to the vents base
April 9, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruptive activity on April 9, 2021

On Friday, lava erupting from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater emerged from a source closer to the vents base (center), a few feet away from the submerged effusive inlet that has been feeding the lava lake for several weeks (lower right). This photo was taken from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, in an area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to

...
On Friday afternoon, April 9, lava entered the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake from two sources near the base of the west vent
April 9, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruptive activity on April 9, 2021

On Friday afternoon, April 9, lava entered the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake from two sources near the base of the west vent (degassing on left side of the image). This photo was taken around 4:00 p.m. HST from the western rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit. The lava source closer to the west vent emerged approximately one hour before this photo was taken. USGS Photo

...
Color photograph of lava lake and crater wall
April 8, 2021

April 8, 2021 — Kīlauea

The crusted-over southern shoreline of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit has accumulated talus (rubble) blocks on the surface since it solidified in February. On April 8, 2021, HVO field geologists noted steaming east of the talus (above the rubble in the photo) that was producing hazy viewing conditions. USGS photo by C. Parcheta.

View of the Kīlauea summit lava lake from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater on April 7, 2021
April 7, 2021

Kīlauea summit lava lake on April 7, 2021

View of the Kīlauea summit lava lake from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater on April 7, 2021. Lava continues to erupt from the west vent, where a diffuse gas plume is visible in the lower left. The active west part of the lava lake (lower center) is a lighter gray color, compared to the darker appearance of the solidified surface crust to the east. This photo was taken

...
A zoomed in view of the active lava lake and western vent, taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit
April 7, 2021

Active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater on April 7, 2021

A zoomed in view of the active lava lake and western vent, taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit. The active lava lake remains perched a few meters (yards) higher than the surrounding solidified lava crust. A few small rafted islands (darker in color) are visible within the active western lava lake. The bluish-white gas plume marks the location

...
April 6, 2021

CVO Monitoring Program: Keeping an Eye on Cascade Volcanoes

The good news is that volcanoes usually change behavior before they erupt, in ways that are detectable by monitoring instruments. During times of relative quiet, scientists use different sensors and instruments to help visualize and quantify the structures and processes that are occurring beneath a volcano so they can provide a better estimate of what might happen when a

Color photograph of lava lake
April 5, 2021

April 5, 2021 — Kīlauea

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active, as seen in this view looking north. Active surface lava is limited to the western (left) portion of the lake between the main island and the western fissure complex. The blueish tinge to the plume from the western fissure complex (left) is due to sulfur dioxide (SO2). USGS photo

...
Color map of lava lake at volcano summit
April 5, 2021

April 5, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map

This map of Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea shows 20 m (66 ft) contour lines (dark gray) that mark locations of equal elevation above sea level (asl). The map shows that the lava lake has filled 225 m (738 ft) of the crater, to an elevation of 742 m (2434 ft) asl since the eruption began on December 20, 2020. Contour lines highlighted in green, purple, and blue mark

...
Color photograph of lava lake
April 2, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption — April 2, 2021

A wide view of the eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea. The western vent and perched lava lake remain active in the western portion of the crater (left). Sulfur dioxide emission rates remain elevated, with the most recent measurement being 1,200 tonnes per day on April 1. USGS photo taken by L. DeSmither on April 2, 2021.