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Land Management Practices

Filter Total Items: 33

Invasive Annual Grass (IAG) Spatial Dataset Compilation and Synthesis

USGS is working closely with partners in the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Intermountain West Joint Venture (IMJV) to collect and summarize spatial datasets that describe measurable aspects of invasive annual grasses (e.g., biomass or presence) across the western United Stated and beyond. The products developed through this project provide...
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Invasive Annual Grass (IAG) Spatial Dataset Compilation and Synthesis

USGS is working closely with partners in the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Intermountain West Joint Venture (IMJV) to collect and summarize spatial datasets that describe measurable aspects of invasive annual grasses (e.g., biomass or presence) across the western United Stated and beyond. The products developed through this project provide...
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Identifying priority science needs for strengthening the science foundation for decision-making in the Bureau of Land Management

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is committed to using science-informed decision-making for the public lands and resources that it manages. Uses on these lands are varied, and decisions are complex. USGS and BLM are working together to identify specific needs for data, science, methods, and mitigation actions that can strengthen the science foundation for BLM planning and management decisions.
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Identifying priority science needs for strengthening the science foundation for decision-making in the Bureau of Land Management

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is committed to using science-informed decision-making for the public lands and resources that it manages. Uses on these lands are varied, and decisions are complex. USGS and BLM are working together to identify specific needs for data, science, methods, and mitigation actions that can strengthen the science foundation for BLM planning and management decisions.
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Developing searchable annotated bibliographies for resource managers

Resource management decisions need to be informed by up-to-date, quality science and data. However there is sometimes an overwhelming number of scientific publications for managers to consider in their decisions. This project provides concise summaries of recent, peer-reviewed science and data products about different resources and topics of management concern, integrated into a searchable tool.
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Developing searchable annotated bibliographies for resource managers

Resource management decisions need to be informed by up-to-date, quality science and data. However there is sometimes an overwhelming number of scientific publications for managers to consider in their decisions. This project provides concise summaries of recent, peer-reviewed science and data products about different resources and topics of management concern, integrated into a searchable tool.
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Optimization of Management Actions for Restoration Success and Wildlife Populations

USGS researchers, in collaboration with the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative and other partners, are developing a statistically based prioritization tool that will aid agencies in their management decisions.
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Optimization of Management Actions for Restoration Success and Wildlife Populations

USGS researchers, in collaboration with the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative and other partners, are developing a statistically based prioritization tool that will aid agencies in their management decisions.
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Using remotely sensed data to evaluate aspects of land health at watershed scales for the Bureau of Land Management in Colorado

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) manages for conditions that sustain land health on over 1 million acres of public rangelands. The BLM has traditionally assessed rangelands using small-scale data, but agency guidance suggests assessment of land health standards at watershed scales. We are exploring methods to integrate remotely sensed data into BLM land health processes.
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Using remotely sensed data to evaluate aspects of land health at watershed scales for the Bureau of Land Management in Colorado

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) manages for conditions that sustain land health on over 1 million acres of public rangelands. The BLM has traditionally assessed rangelands using small-scale data, but agency guidance suggests assessment of land health standards at watershed scales. We are exploring methods to integrate remotely sensed data into BLM land health processes.
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Exploring the Utility of Short Science Syntheses for Use in NEPA Analyses in the Bureau of Land Management

Use of scientific information is fundamental to understanding how proposed actions on public lands may impact the environment. However agencies often have limited time to compile and synthesize existing science on a topic. We are working with the Bureau of Land Management to explore the utility of short science syntheses for facilitating use of the best available science in public lands decisions.
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Exploring the Utility of Short Science Syntheses for Use in NEPA Analyses in the Bureau of Land Management

Use of scientific information is fundamental to understanding how proposed actions on public lands may impact the environment. However agencies often have limited time to compile and synthesize existing science on a topic. We are working with the Bureau of Land Management to explore the utility of short science syntheses for facilitating use of the best available science in public lands decisions.
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Understanding and fostering use of habitat models for rare plants in Bureau of Land Management planning and management decisions

The use of rare plant habitat models in public lands decisions can be hampered by factors such as a lack of understanding of or confidence in underlying data, a lack of access to models, and a lack of opportunity for model use in decisions. This project seeks to explore and suggest potential solutions to these challenges, facilitating greater use of habitat models in public lands decision-making.
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Understanding and fostering use of habitat models for rare plants in Bureau of Land Management planning and management decisions

The use of rare plant habitat models in public lands decisions can be hampered by factors such as a lack of understanding of or confidence in underlying data, a lack of access to models, and a lack of opportunity for model use in decisions. This project seeks to explore and suggest potential solutions to these challenges, facilitating greater use of habitat models in public lands decision-making.
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Developing a step-by-step process for assessing cumulative effects in the Bureau of Land Management

The National Environmental Policy Act requires federal agencies to assess potential impacts of proposed actions as part of their decision-making processes. Due to the complex nature of cumulative effects analyses, many are currently limited in nature. We are working with the Bureau of Land Management to develop a process that staff can use to strengthen cumulative effects analyses.
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Developing a step-by-step process for assessing cumulative effects in the Bureau of Land Management

The National Environmental Policy Act requires federal agencies to assess potential impacts of proposed actions as part of their decision-making processes. Due to the complex nature of cumulative effects analyses, many are currently limited in nature. We are working with the Bureau of Land Management to develop a process that staff can use to strengthen cumulative effects analyses.
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Informing the Habitat Assessment Framework Process—An Assessment to Understand Habitat Patch Composition and Configuration Requirements for Range-Wide Sage-Grouse Persistence

USGS scientists are developing multiple products to directly inform the Bureau of Land Management's Sage-grouse Habitat Assessment Framework process.
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Informing the Habitat Assessment Framework Process—An Assessment to Understand Habitat Patch Composition and Configuration Requirements for Range-Wide Sage-Grouse Persistence

USGS scientists are developing multiple products to directly inform the Bureau of Land Management's Sage-grouse Habitat Assessment Framework process.
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Integration of Genetic and Demographic Data to Assess the Relative Importance of Connectivity and Habitat in Sage-Grouse Populations

Using the existing rangewide genetic and demographic data, scientists from the USGS, USDA Forest Service, and University of Waterloo will assess the relative contributions of habitat and genetic connectivity to lek size and stability.
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Integration of Genetic and Demographic Data to Assess the Relative Importance of Connectivity and Habitat in Sage-Grouse Populations

Using the existing rangewide genetic and demographic data, scientists from the USGS, USDA Forest Service, and University of Waterloo will assess the relative contributions of habitat and genetic connectivity to lek size and stability.
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Economic Implications of Sagebrush Treatment and Restoration Practices Across the Great Basin and Wyoming

USGS and Colorado State University researchers are conducting analyses and predictions of sagebrush recovery in the Great Basin and Wyoming and assess the role of weather, soils, and reseeding treatments.
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Economic Implications of Sagebrush Treatment and Restoration Practices Across the Great Basin and Wyoming

USGS and Colorado State University researchers are conducting analyses and predictions of sagebrush recovery in the Great Basin and Wyoming and assess the role of weather, soils, and reseeding treatments.
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Modeling Habitat-Relationships of Pinyon-Juniper and Sagebrush Associated Bird Species to Inform Conifer Removal

Management agencies are increasingly restoring sagebrush systems by removing conifers. These treatments likely result in mixed effects for wildlife species, and wildlife response may vary across the landscape. Declining sagebrush and pinyon-juniper associated bird populations highlight a clear need for tools that can help guide conifer management across the sagebrush ecosystem.
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Modeling Habitat-Relationships of Pinyon-Juniper and Sagebrush Associated Bird Species to Inform Conifer Removal

Management agencies are increasingly restoring sagebrush systems by removing conifers. These treatments likely result in mixed effects for wildlife species, and wildlife response may vary across the landscape. Declining sagebrush and pinyon-juniper associated bird populations highlight a clear need for tools that can help guide conifer management across the sagebrush ecosystem.
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