New York Water Science Center

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Our New York Water Science Center priority is to continue the important work of the Department of the Interior and the USGS, while also maintaining the health and safety of our employees and community.  Based on guidance from the White House, the CDC, and state and local authorities, we are shifting our operations to a virtual mode and have minimal staffing within our offices. 

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Current Water Conditions

Current Water Conditions

Current water conditions in New York

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Science

Science

New York WSC science projects

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News

Date published: November 24, 2021

Field Photo Friday Winner for November 2021

The New York Water Science Center works under pressure. (Credit Chany C Huddleston Adrianza, USGS NY WSC, Public Domain.)

Date published: October 14, 2021

Project Underway to Identify Algal Toxins in US National Park Waterways

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service partnered on a first-of-its-kind, nationwide harmful algal bloom, or HAB, field study that began this summer and will continue over the next two years.

Publications

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Year Published: 2021

The water quality of selected streams in the Catskill and Delaware water-supply watersheds in New York, 1999–2009

From October 1, 1999, through September 30, 2009, water-quality samples were collected, and discharge was measured at 13 streamgages within the Catskill and Delaware watersheds of the New York City water supply system. The Catskill and Delaware watersheds supply about 90 percent of the water needed by 9 million customers. On average, 59 water-...

McHale, Michael R.; Siemion, Jason; Murdoch, Peter S.
McHale, M.R., Siemion, J., and Murdoch, P.S., 2021, The water quality of selected streams in the Catskill and Delaware water-supply watersheds in New York, 1999–2009: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2020–5049, 48 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20205049.

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Year Published: 2021

Turbidity–suspended-sediment concentration regression equations for monitoring stations in the upper Esopus Creek watershed, Ulster County, New York, 2016–19

Upper Esopus Creek is the primary tributary to the Ashokan Reservoir, part of the New York City water-supply system. Elevated concentrations of suspended sediment and turbidity in the watershed of the creek are of concern for the system.Water samples were collected through a range of streamflow and turbidity at 14 monitoring sites in the upper...

Siemion, Jason; Bonville, Donald B.; McHale, Michael R.; Antidormi, Michael R.
Siemion, J., Bonville, D.B., McHale, M.R., and Antidormi, M.R., 2021, Turbidity–suspended-sediment concentration regression equations for monitoring stations in the upper Esopus Creek watershed, Ulster County, New York, 2016–19: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2021–1065, 27 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20211065.

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Year Published: 2021

Cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin synthetase gene, and cyanotoxin occurrence among selected large river sites of the conterminous United States, 2017–18

The U.S. Geological Survey measured cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin synthetase genes, and cyanotoxins at 11 river sites throughout the conterminous United States in a multiyear pilot study during 2017–19 through the National Water Quality Assessment Project to better understand the occurrence of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in large inland and coastal...

Zuellig, Robert E.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Loftin, Keith A.; Rosen, Barry H.
Zuellig, R.E., Graham, J.L., Stelzer, E.A., Loftin, K.A., and Rosen, B.H., 2021, Cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin synthetase gene, and cyanotoxin occurrence among selected large river sites of the conterminous United States, 2017–18: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5121, 22 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215121.