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Images

Aerial orthomosaic photo of Whale's Tail Marsh south in May 2022
Aerial orthomosaic photo of Whale's Tail Marsh south in May 2022
Aerial orthomosaic photo of Whale's Tail Marsh south in May 2022
Aerial orthomosaic photo of Whale's Tail Marsh south in May 2022

Aerial orthomosaic photo of Whale's Tail Marsh south (WTMS) in May 2022 with marsh-edge boundary drawn in orange at elevation of the scarp head contour.

Aerial orthomosaic photo of Whale's Tail Marsh south (WTMS) in May 2022 with marsh-edge boundary drawn in orange at elevation of the scarp head contour.

A USGS researcher in a kayak tows instruments to measure water level and suspended-sediment concentration
A USGS researcher in a kayak tows instruments to measure water level and suspended-sediment concentration
A USGS researcher in a kayak tows instruments to measure water level and suspended-sediment concentration
A USGS researcher in a kayak tows instruments to measure water level and suspended-sediment concentration

A USGS researcher in a kayak tows instruments to measure water level and suspended-sediment concentration in Whale's Tail South marsh, San Francisco Bay, CA.

A USGS researcher in a kayak tows instruments to measure water level and suspended-sediment concentration in Whale's Tail South marsh, San Francisco Bay, CA.

Photo of a semipalmated plover (a small shorebird) consuming a polychaete worm in an intertidal area
A semipalmated plover (a small shorebird) consuming a polychaete worm in an intertidal area
A semipalmated plover (a small shorebird) consuming a polychaete worm in an intertidal area
A semipalmated plover (a small shorebird) consuming a polychaete worm in an intertidal area

A semipalmated plover (a small shorebird) consuming a polychaete worm in an intertidal area.

Restored tidal marsh at Nisqually River Delta
Restored tidal marsh at Nisqually River Delta
Restored tidal marsh at Nisqually River Delta
Restored tidal marsh at Nisqually River Delta

Restored tidal marsh at the Nisqually River Delta within Billy Frank Jr. National Wildlife Refuge, Washington.

Restored tidal marsh at the Nisqually River Delta within Billy Frank Jr. National Wildlife Refuge, Washington.

Photo of a whimbrel (a large shorebird) consuming a burrowing shrimp in an intertidal area
A whimbrel (a large shorebird) consuming a burrowing shrimp in an intertidal area
A whimbrel (a large shorebird) consuming a burrowing shrimp in an intertidal area
A whimbrel (a large shorebird) consuming a burrowing shrimp in an intertidal area

A whimbrel (a large shorebird) consuming a burrowing shrimp in an intertidal area.

Map showing study area of benthic macroinvertebrate response to Nisqually River Delta marsh restoration
Study area of benthic macroinvertebrate response to Nisqually River Delta marsh restoration
Study area of benthic macroinvertebrate response to Nisqually River Delta marsh restoration
Study area of benthic macroinvertebrate response to Nisqually River Delta marsh restoration

Sampling sites are color-coded by habitat. White labels indicate site names. Marsh sites: U1, Unit 1; U2, Unit 2; U3, Unit 3; U4, Unit 4; M, Madrone; P1, Phase 1 restoration; P2, Phase 2 restoration; RF, reference. For Marsh sites, the last letter indicates the position along a tidal channel: N, north; M, middle; S, south; W, west.

Sampling sites are color-coded by habitat. White labels indicate site names. Marsh sites: U1, Unit 1; U2, Unit 2; U3, Unit 3; U4, Unit 4; M, Madrone; P1, Phase 1 restoration; P2, Phase 2 restoration; RF, reference. For Marsh sites, the last letter indicates the position along a tidal channel: N, north; M, middle; S, south; W, west.

Videos

Elwha River Mouth flyover and timelapse cover image Elwha River Mouth virtual flyover and timelapse
Elwha River Mouth virtual flyover and timelapse
Elwha River Mouth virtual flyover and timelapse

This PlaneCam video was produced by developing animation tracklines in ArcGlobe, using imagery from PlaneCam flights.

This PlaneCam video was produced by developing animation tracklines in ArcGlobe, using imagery from PlaneCam flights.

Cover image for timelapse at Lake Mills Delta, Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Lake Mills Delta timelapse
Lake Mills Delta timelapse
Lake Mills Delta timelapse

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Cover image for timelapse at the Elwha River Mouth on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Elwha River Mouth timelapse
Elwha River Mouth timelapse
Elwha River Mouth timelapse

This PlaneCam video was produced by developing animation tracklines in ArcGlobe, using imagery from PlaneCam flights.

This PlaneCam video was produced by developing animation tracklines in ArcGlobe, using imagery from PlaneCam flights.

Cover image for timelapse at Glines Canyon Dam, Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Glines Canyon Dam timelapse
Glines Canyon Dam timelapse
Glines Canyon Dam timelapse

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Cover image for timelapse at Lake Aldwell Delta, Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Lake Aldwell Delta timelapse
Lake Aldwell Delta timelapse
Lake Aldwell Delta timelapse

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Cover image for timelapse at Lower Lake Aldwell, Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington Lower Lake Aldwell timelapse
Lower Lake Aldwell timelapse
Lower Lake Aldwell timelapse

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Timelapsed photo data is sequenced at about 1 pixel-averaged frame per day, meaning that all of the images from a given day are combined, and the RGB values for a given x/y location on the image are the average of every RGB value for that location for that day. 

Audio

Eyes on Earth thumbnail image for Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline showing guest Sean Vitousek on a watercraft
Thumbnail image for EonE Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline
Thumbnail image for EonE Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline
Eyes on Earth Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline
Eyes on Earth Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline
Eyes on Earth thumbnail image for Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline showing guest Sean Vitousek on a watercraft
Thumbnail image for EonE Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline
Thumbnail image for EonE Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline
Eyes on Earth Episode 120 – Mapping the California Coastline

In this episode of Eyes on Earth, we begin a series on Landsat’s usefulness in coastal studies. First, we talk with Sean Vitousek, a USGS research oceanographer, about changes to beaches in California and how he is using Landsat and other data to create models that can predict how the coastline may change in the future because of sea level rise and coastal erosion.

In this episode of Eyes on Earth, we begin a series on Landsat’s usefulness in coastal studies. First, we talk with Sean Vitousek, a USGS research oceanographer, about changes to beaches in California and how he is using Landsat and other data to create models that can predict how the coastline may change in the future because of sea level rise and coastal erosion.

Webcams

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 2 bright image
Nuvuk video camera 2 bright image
Nuvuk video camera 2 bright image

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 1 dark image
Nuvuk video camera 1 dark image
Nuvuk video camera 1 dark image

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 2 dark image
Nuvuk video camera 2 dark image
Nuvuk video camera 2 dark image

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 2 snapshop
Nuvuk video camera 2 snapshop
Nuvuk video camera 2 snapshop

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 1 time exposure
Nuvuk video camera 1 time exposure
Nuvuk video camera 1 time exposure

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

View of an Arctic beach area with gentle waters.
Nuvuk video camera 2 time exposure
Nuvuk video camera 2 time exposure
Nuvuk video camera 2 time exposure

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.

Two video cameras are installed atop a utility pole near the northernmost point of land in the United States at Nuvuk (Point Barrow), Alaska. The cameras point northwest toward the Arctic Ocean and the boundary between the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Every half hour during daylight hours, the cameras collect snapshots and video for 10 minutes.