Office of Tribal Relations

Home

The USGS Office of Tribal Relations (OTR) builds partnerships between the USGS and Native American and Alaska Native governments, tribal organizations, and other federal agencies to help the USGS meet its mission of conducting gold-standard scientific research in order to describe and understand our planet’s natural systems and resources, and by doing so, enhance and protect our quality of life.

Tribal Liaison Team

Tribal Liaison Team

The Liaison Team represents each USGS region/geographic area, scientific mission area, and the bureau as a whole; building and strengthening partnerships with other federal agencies, universities, and numerous tribes throughout the United States.

Meet the Team

Feature Stories

Feature Stories

Feature Stories and highlights on USGS work in partnership with Native American tribal governments, tribal communities, and much more.

Read More

News

Date published: April 21, 2020

TESNAR 2020 Awardees

USGS Technical training in Support of Native American Relations (TESNAR) makes funds available to support USGS employees to design and conduct technical training for staff of tribal governments or organizations. The purpose of the program is to strengthen the technical capacity of tribes for managing tribal natural resources and build on networks between the USGS and tribal governments.

Date published: May 6, 2019

TESNAR 2019 Awardees

USGS Technical training in Support of Native American Relations (TESNAR) makes funds available to support USGS employees to design and conduct technical training for staff of tribal governments or organizations. The purpose of the program is to strengthen the technical capacity of tribes for managing tribal natural resources and build on networks between the USGS and tribal governments.  

Date published: June 12, 2017

Water is Life for the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

For the Swinomish people of northwestern Washington, water is life. But this symbiotic relationship between man and nature has been disrupted, and increasingly threatened, by sea-level rise and changes in Northwestern storm and rainfall patterns.

Publications

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Hydrogeologic characterization of the Hualapai Plateau on the western Hualapai Indian Reservation, northwestern Arizona

This study was developed to assess if groundwater from the western Hualapai Plateau could be used to supply developments in the Grand Canyon West area of the Hualapai Indian Reservation and to collect hydrogeologic data for future use in a numerical groundwater model for the reservation. Ground-based geophysical surveys; existing well, spring, and...

Mason, Jon P.; Macy, Jamie P.; Bills, Donald J.; Gungle, Bruce W.; Jones, Casey J.
Mason, J.P., Macy, J.P., Bills, D.J., Gungle, B.W., and Jones, C.J., 2020, Hydrogeologic characterization of the Hualapai Plateau on the western Hualapai Indian Reservation, northwestern Arizona: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2020–5025, 38 p, https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20205025.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2019

The lava flow that came to Hilo—The 1880–81 eruption of Mauna Loa volcano, Island of Hawai‘i

The Mauna Loa eruption sequence of 1880–81 consists of two eruptions. The May 1880 eruption in Mokuʻāweoweo at the summit of Mauna Loa lasted just a few days and was followed 6 months later by three lava flows that issued from vents along the Northeast Rift Zone. The November 1880 eruption lasted almost a year and one of its flows nearly reached...

Kauahikaua, James P.; Gaddis, Ben; Kanahele, Ku`ulei; Hon, Ken; Wasser, Valerie
Kauahikaua, J., Gaddis, B., Kanahele, K., Hon, K., and Wasser, V., 2019, The lava flow that came to Hilo—The 1880–81 eruption of Mauna Loa volcano, Island of Hawai‘i: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2019–5129, 35 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20195129.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2019

Vulnerability of subsistence systems due to social and environmental change: A case study in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

Arctic Indigenous communities have been classified as highly vulnerable to climate change impacts. The remoteness of Arctic communities, their dependence upon local species and habitats, and the historical marginalization of Indigenous peoples, enhances this characterization of vulnerability. However, vulnerability is a result of diverse...

Herman-Mercer, Nicole M.; Laituri, Melinda; Massey, Maggie; Matkin, Elli; Toohey, Ryan C.; Elder, Kelly; Schuster, Paul F.; Mutter, Edda A.