Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC)

Climate Change

Filter Total Items: 7
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Water Temperature in Rivers and Streams

Increases in summer stream temperature as a result of human impacts and climate change may exceed the thermal tolerances of aquatic biota that are adapted to colder environments and climates. The combined effects of humans and climate change are of global concern across the range of coldwater aquatic organisms.

Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Plant Responses to Temperature and Water Limitation

Weather and climate impacts on dominant native perennials must be understood in order to efficiently manage our western landscapes. We use an ecophysiological approach, linking to population, community, and landscape ecology, to understand the impacts and responses of plants on or to their environment.

Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Nitrogen Deficiency and Excess in Forests: Patterns, Mechanisms and Management

This research theme facilitates the sound management and restoration of Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests, as well as to refine broader-scale predictions of how temperate forests will function in an increasingly nitrogen-rich world.

Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Effects of Climate Change and Other Environmental Stressors on Water Birds and Their Habitats

Predicted climate impacts on arid U.S. Great Basin wetlands will alter their number, distribution, and quality (e.g., salinity). The scarcity and isolation of these wetlands make them essential not only to wildlife but to ranchers, farmers, and urban areas that rely on their ecosystem services. Great Basin wetlands are important habitats for migratory birds at high volumes, but they become...

Contacts: Susan M Haig
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Developing Tools for Climate Change Adaptation

Resource managers contend with achieving goals and mandates in an ever-changing world of exotic species invasions, emerging diseases, extinction risks, and shifting public expectations among others. These challenges must be faced in the context of a changing climate, which potentially alters ecosystem structure and function and undermines the predictability of ecosystem response to management...

Contacts: Andrea Woodward
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Climate and Ecosystem Biogeochemistry

This research theme advance fundamental understanding of climate-biogeochemistry interactions, with wide applicability to virtually all terrestrial ecosystems.

Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Climate and Aquatic Ecosystems

Effects of changing climate on aquatic ecosystems requires understanding a complex series of interactions between terrestrial climates, their corresponding impacts on hydrological processes, and ultimately a suite of biological responses. These uncertainties stand in contrast to the urgent need for reliable information to be used in developing long-term strategies for climate adaptation to...

Contacts: Jason B Dunham