Western Ecological Research Center (WERC)

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The Western Ecological Research Center (WERC) is a USGS Ecosystems Mission Area operation serving primarily California and Nevada. WERC scientists work closely with Federal, State, academic, and other collaborators to address a diverse array of high-profile topics. Topics include research on effects of wildfire, sea level rise, drought, energy development and more on federal Trust species.

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News

Date published: March 4, 2019

Genetics study reveals good news for the southern California population of the California gnatcatcher

Results of a recent study by WERC scientists are providing helpful information to resource managers as they work to protect important habitat.

Date published: December 21, 2018

It Takes Collaboration!

Cloud Forest restoration gallery exhibit on display at the Channel Islands National Park Visitor Center.

Date published: October 26, 2018

A Unified Research Strategy for Disease Management

As wildlife diseases increase globally, an understanding of host-pathogen relationships can elucidate avenues for management and improve conservation efficacy. Amphibians are among the most threatened groups of wildlife, and disease is a major factor in global amphibian declines.

Publications

Year Published: 2019

Fish culling reduces tapeworm burden in Arctic charr by increasing parasite mortality rather than by reducing density‐dependent transmission

Two common Dibothriocephalus (formerly Diphyllobothrium) tapeworm species were significantly reduced by experimental culling of their fish host Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in a subarctic lake.Between 1984 and 1991, funnel traps were used to cull ~35 metric tons of Arctic charr, reducing charr density by ~80%. As charr...

Henriksen, Eirik H.; Frainer, Andre; Knudsen, Rune; Kristoffersen, Roar; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Amundsen, Per-Arne

Year Published: 2019

Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) population biology at Big Sur and Monterey, California --Investigating the consequences of resource abundance and anthropogenic stressors for sea otter recovery

The range of the southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) spans most of the central California coast from Half Moon Bay to Gaviota. Some coastal areas within this range are heavily developed and highly impacted by humans, while other areas are wild and largely pristine. Determining the relative importance of food resource abundance,...

Tinker, M. Tim; Tomoleoni, Joseph A.; Weitzman, Benjamin P.; Staedler, Michelle; Jessup, Dave; Murray, Michael J.; Miller, Melissa; Burgess, Tristan; Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Thometz, Nicole; Tarjan, Lily; Golson, Emily; Batac, Francesca; Dodd, Erin; Berberich, Eva; Kunz, Jessica; Bentall, Gena; Fujii, Jessica; Nicholson, Teri; Newsome, Seth; Melli, Ann; LaRoche, Nicole; MacCormick, Holly; Johnson, Andy; Henkel, Laird; Kreuder-Johnson, Chris; Conrad, Pat
Tinker, M.T., Tomoleoni, J.A., Weitzman, B.P., Staedler, M., Jessup, D., Murray, M.J., Miller, M., Burgess, T., Bowen, L., Miles, A.K., Thometz, N., Tarjan, L., Golson, E., Batac, F., Dodd, E., Berberich, E., Kunz, J., Bentall, G., Fujii, J., Nicholson, T., Newsome, S., Melli, A., LaRoche, N., MacCormick, H., Johnson, A., Henkel, L., Kreuder-Johnson, C., and Conrad, P., 2019, Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) population biology at Big Sur and Monterey, California --Investigating the consequences of resource abundance and anthropogenic stressors for sea otter recovery: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2019 -1022, 225 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20191022.

Year Published: 2019

Abundance and productivity of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) off central California during the 2018 breeding season

Executive SummaryMarbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) have been listed as “endangered” by the State of California and “threatened” by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service since 1992 in California, Oregon, and Washington. Information regarding marbled murrelet abundance, distribution, population trends, and habitat associations is critical...

Felis, Jonathan J.; Kelsey, Emily C.; Adams, Josh
Felis, J.J., Kelsey, E.C., and Adams, J., 2019, Abundance and productivity of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) off central California during the 2018 breeding season: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1107, 10 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ds1107.