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Great Lakes Science Center

Welcome!  The Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) is part of the Midcontinent Region of the USGS, DOI Regions 3 and 5. Our scientists work in the Great Lakes region and other parts of the country to meet the nation’s need for scientific information used by resource managers to restore, enhance, manage, and protect the living resources and habitats in the Great Lakes basin. 

News

What Sea Lampreys Do in the Dark: A Valentine’s Story

What Sea Lampreys Do in the Dark: A Valentine’s Story

Pavlovic, Bickford Participate in Manoomin Workshop and Field Day with Michigan Wild Rice Initiative

Pavlovic, Bickford Participate in Manoomin Workshop and Field Day with Michigan Wild Rice Initiative

GLSC Researchers Serve as Focus Area Representatives at GLRI Public Engagement Session in Detroit

GLSC Researchers Serve as Focus Area Representatives at GLRI Public Engagement Session in Detroit

Publications

How diverse is the toolbox? A review of management actions to conserve or restore coregonines

Over the past centuries, coregonines have been exposed to a range of stressors that have led to extinctions, extirpations, and speciation reversals. Given that some populations remain at risk and fishery managers have begun restoring coregonines where they have been extirpated, we reviewed the primary and gray literature to describe the diversity of coregonine restoration or conservation actions t
Authors
David Bunnell, Orlane Anneville, Jan Baer, Colin Bean, Kimmo Kahlilainen, Alfred Sandstrom, Oliver Selz, Pascal Vonlanthen, Josef Wanzenbock, Brian C. Weidel

The Metzger marsh restoration: A vegetation-centric look after 27 years

We investigated wetland vegetation before, during, and after dike construction at the Metzger Marsh project in western Lake Erie, which was designed to restore a 300-ha wetland that had been degraded following the loss of a protective barrier beach. A dike was constructed in 1995 to replace the function of the eroded barrier beach, but it contained a water-control structure to allow managed hydrol
Authors
Douglas A. Wilcox, Kurt P. Kowalski, Alexandra (Sasha) A Bozimowski

Invasive species research—Science for prevention, detection, containment, and control

IntroductionInvasive species research within the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Ecosystems Mission Area focuses on invasive plants, animals, and pathogens throughout the United States. USGS scientists provide science support to help solve the problems posed by these nonnative species while working with partners in the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), other Federal, State, and Territorial ag
Authors
Paul J. Heimowitz, Patrick M. Kocovsky, James J. English

Science

Long-term Monitoring of Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands and Contributions to the Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program

The Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program (CWMP) is an EPA-led program to monitor the health of all Great Lakes coastal wetlands larger than four hectares. USGS scientists are working with Principal Investigators from many State and academic institutions to conduct data collection, implement standardized sampling protocols, analyze multiparameter data, and communicate results to the public.
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Long-term Monitoring of Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands and Contributions to the Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program

The Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program (CWMP) is an EPA-led program to monitor the health of all Great Lakes coastal wetlands larger than four hectares. USGS scientists are working with Principal Investigators from many State and academic institutions to conduct data collection, implement standardized sampling protocols, analyze multiparameter data, and communicate results to the public.
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Invasive Phragmites Science: Using Microbial Interactions to Foster the Restoration of Great Lakes Wetlands

The USGS is developing innovative Phragmites control measures to keep this rapidly spreading invasive plant from further expanding its range into new wetland habitats and to aid in the development of successful restoration strategies. Scientists are conducting studies and field tests to determine (1) if microbes (i.e., fungi and bacteria) that live within and around Phragmites are enabling the...
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Invasive Phragmites Science: Using Microbial Interactions to Foster the Restoration of Great Lakes Wetlands

The USGS is developing innovative Phragmites control measures to keep this rapidly spreading invasive plant from further expanding its range into new wetland habitats and to aid in the development of successful restoration strategies. Scientists are conducting studies and field tests to determine (1) if microbes (i.e., fungi and bacteria) that live within and around Phragmites are enabling the...
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Restoring Wetland Habitat and Function at the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

Hydrologic connectivity is essential to maintaining coastal wetland services and functionality. Impounded wetlands often do not provide essential services such as flood mitigation and nutrient retention, nor can they be utilized as spawning and nursery habitat by important Great Lakes fishes. The Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge manages hundreds of acres of historical coastal wetland habitat...
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Restoring Wetland Habitat and Function at the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

Hydrologic connectivity is essential to maintaining coastal wetland services and functionality. Impounded wetlands often do not provide essential services such as flood mitigation and nutrient retention, nor can they be utilized as spawning and nursery habitat by important Great Lakes fishes. The Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge manages hundreds of acres of historical coastal wetland habitat...
Learn More