Water Resources

Multimedia

This multimedia gallery represents a collection of high-quality images, videos, webcams, posters, presentations, and documents produced by the Water Resources Mission Area.

Filter Total Items: 1,630
Flooding at Vekol Wash, Arizona
October 2, 2018

Flooding at Vekol Wash, Arizona

Flooding at Vekol Wash today, south of Phoenix, following remnant rains from Hurricane Rosa. 

Water budget visualization for Buck Creek-Delaware River
September 30, 2018

Water budget visualization for Buck Creek-Delaware River

Example water budget visualization for Buck Creek-Delaware River showing the difference between inflow and outflow components.  Full visualization application is located at https://cida.usgs.gov/nwc-static/waterbudget-viz/

September 27, 2018

A USGS guide for finding and interpreting high-water marks (AD)

High-water marks provide valuable data for understanding recent and historical flood events. The proper collection and recording of high-water mark data from perishable and preserved evidence informs flood assessments, research, and water resource management. This video provides guidance for skilled high-water mark identification, including marks left behind in natural and

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A hydrographer checks a high water mark on a door frame
September 25, 2018

Double-checking a high water mark on a church door near Maxton, NC

USGS hydrographer Daniel McCay uses a level to double-check a high water mark on a church door near Maxton, NC as his USGS colleague Mary Winsor observes on Sept. 25, 2018, in the wake of flooding brought on by Hurricane Florence.

A hydrographer marks a high water mark on the eaves of a church
September 21, 2018

A high water mark above the eaves of a Spring Hill, NC house

USGS hydrologic technician Rob Forde flags a high water mark above the eaves at Presbyterian Church of the Covenant, 118 Manchester Road, Spring Hill, North Carolina on Sept. 21, 2018, in the wake of flooding brought on by Hurricane Florence.

September 19, 2018

A USGS guide for finding and interpreting high-water marks

High-water marks provide valuable data for understanding recent and historical flood events. The proper collection and recording of high-water mark data from perishable and preserved evidence informs flood assessments, research, and water resource management. This video provides guidance for skilled high-water mark identification, including marks left behind in natural and

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A hydrographer kneels in water to measure a high water mark on a wall.
September 18, 2018

Measuring a high water mark as flooding recedes

USGS hydrographer Kyle Marchman measures a high water mark on the rear wall of a Kangaroo gas station on Highway 24 north of Fayetteville, NC on Sept. 18, 2018, after flooding caused by Hurricane Florence.

USGS intern James Stonecypher measures Lumber River floodwaters
September 17, 2018

Measuring the Lumber River floodwaters

James Stonecypher measures flood waters from the Lumber River that breached a dam in Lumberton, North Carolina after the passage of Hurricane Florence, Sept. 17, 2018. 

Map of USGS streamgages at or over flood stage in NC Sept. 19, 2018
September 16, 2018

As Florence rains, rivers keep rising, submerging some USGS instrument

A WaterWatch web map shows streamgages in North and South Carolina that approached or exceeded major flood stage EST on September 19, 2018, as the former Hurricane Florence, now downgraded to a tropical depression, deluged the states with rain.

USGS scientist takes measurement in a flooded NC creek
September 16, 2018

Working to keep vital flood information flowing in the Carolinas

David Stillwell, USGS hydrologic technician, performs a discharge measurement to help document and forecast flooding caused by Hurricane Florence at Long Creek in Rhyne, North Carolina on Sept. 16. 

 

Image shows a USGS storm tide sensor attached to a pier
September 10, 2018

USGS Storm-Tide Sensor for Hurricane Florence

A USGS storm-tide sensor, deployed in advance of Hurricane Florence's landfall. The sensors are housed in vented steel pipes a few inches wide and about a foot long. They are being installed on bridges, piers, and other structures that have a good chance of surviving the storm.

The information the sensors collect will help define the depth and duration of a storm

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