Landsat Missions

Home

Since 1972, the joint NASA/ U.S. Geological Survey Landsat series of Earth Observation satellites have continuously acquired images of the Earth’s land surface, providing uninterrupted data to help land managers and policymakers make informed decisions about natural resources and the environment.

Landsat is a part of the USGS National Land Imaging (NLI) Program.

Latest Landsat Headlines

Landsat Science Products

Landsat Science Products

Landsat Level-2 and Level-3 Science Products contain higher-level data to allow scientists to better document changes to Earth's terrestrial environment.

Learn More

U.S. Landsat ARD

U.S. Landsat ARD

Landsat data that have been processed to allow analysis with a minimum of additional user effort.

Learn More

Landsat Collections

Landsat Collections

Collections ensures all Landsat Level-1 products provide a consistent archive of known data quality while controlling continuous improvement of the archive and access to all data as they are acquired.

Learn More

 

 

News

Date published: September 11, 2020

Landsat Science Team Member: Satellites Can Play Greater Role in Informing Global Policies

It shouldn’t surprise anyone that scientists and engineers are constantly pushing the envelope to improve remote-sensing data and their utility, says Matt Hansen, a Landsat Science Team (LST) member and professor in the Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland in College Park.

Date published: August 25, 2020

Lunar Calibration with Landsat

The next full moon will come on September 2, 2020. And when you look up to see it, so will Landsat 8. As probably the most accurate Earth imaging satellite system, Landsat has multiple ways of calibrating data to ensure its accuracy and interoperability with other satellites. One of the strategies the calibration engineers use is lunar calibration.

Date published: August 17, 2020

Landsat 7 Flight Operations Team Celebrates Eight Straight Years of No Operator Errors

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Landsat 7 Flight Operations Team achieved nothing less than a major milestone in mid-July of 2020. For eight straight years, they had not one operator error. Not one.

Publications

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

40 years strong—Long-time Geoscience Australia, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnership benefits both agencies and the world

In 1979, the Australian Government chose the city of Alice Springs to host a Landsat Ground Station because of its location in central Australia. This location enables satellite coverage of the entire Australian continent. Its antennas have played a key role in supporting international satellite programs over more than 40 years.

U.S. Geological Survey, 2020, 40 years strong—Long-time Geoscience Australia, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnership benefits both agencies and the world: U.S. Geological Survey General Information Product 206, 2 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/gip206.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

National Land Imaging Program

Changes taking place across the Earth’s land surface have the potential to affect people, economies, and the environment on a daily basis. Our Nation’s economic security and environmental vitality rely on continuous monitoring of the Earth’s continents, islands, and coastal regions to record, study, and understand land change at local, regional,...

Young, Steven M.
Young, S.M., 2020, National Land Imaging Program: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2020–3034, 4 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/fs20203034.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2019

Economic valuation of landsat imagery

Landsat satellites have been operating since 1972, providing a continuous global record of the Earth’s land surface. The imagery is currently available at no cost through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). A previous USGS study estimated that Landsat imagery provided users an annual benefit of $2.19 billion in 2011, with U.S. users accounting for...

Straub, Crista L.; Koontz, Stephen R.; Loomis, John B.
Straub, C.L., Koontz, S.R., and Loomis, J.B., 2019, Economic valuation of Landsat imagery: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2019–1112, 13 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20191112.