Water Resources

Common Water Issues

Floods

Floods

 

Flood monitoring data helps protect life and property

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The Water Cycle

The Water Cycle

Water is constantly moving through the hydrologic cycle

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Filter Total Items: 152
Date published: March 3, 2019
Status: Active

Transportation-Related Water Projects

The USGS has a long history of cooperative investigations with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and state highway agencies to provide data and information to address various issues related to water resources and the Nation’s transportation infrastructure. These issues cover a wide spectrum and include items such as regional flow statistics, flood documentation, regional stream...

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 3, 2019
Status: Active

Sediment Acoustics

The U.S. Geological Survey recognizes the need to provide sediment acoustic training and to develop standardized techniques and practices.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

Fluvial Sediment and Geomorphology: Resources for Monitoring and Analysis

The USGS collects fluvial sediment and geomorphic data and conducts related research at numerous sites across the Nation. This information is essential to informed solutions to sediment-related and overall water resource management issues.

Contacts: Molly S Wood
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)

Since 1981, the USGS has been the lead Federal agency for the monitoring of wet atmospheric deposition (chemical constituents deposited from the atmosphere via rain, sleet, and snow) for the interagency National Atmospheric Deposition Program. NADP monitoring networks provide long-term, high-quality atmospheric deposition data used to support research and decision-making.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

Emerging Contaminants

Emerging contaminants, or contaminants of emerging concern, can refer to many different kinds of chemicals, including medicines, personal care or household cleaning products, lawn care and agricultural products, among others. These chemicals make it into our Nation's lakes and rivers and have a detrimental affect on fish and other aquatic species. That have also been shown to...

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

Groundwater Quality Research

Every day, millions of gallons of groundwater are pumped to supply drinking water for about 140 million people, almost one-half of the Nation’s population. Learn about the quality and availability of groundwater for drinking, where and why groundwater quality is degraded, and where groundwater quality is changing.

Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

Water Quality in the Nation’s Streams and Rivers – Current Conditions and Long-Term Trends

The Nation's rivers and streams are a priceless resource, but pollution from urban and agricultural areas pose a threat to our water quality. To understand the value of water quality, and to more effectively manage and protect the Nation's water resources, it's critical that we know the current status of water-quality conditions, and how and why those conditions have been changing over time....

Contacts: Lori Sprague
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

Groundwater/Surface-Water Interaction

Water and the chemicals it contains are constantly being exchanged between the land surface and the subsurface. Surface water seeps into the ground and recharges the underlying aquifer—groundwater discharges to the surface and supplies the stream with baseflow. USGS Integrated Watershed Studies assess these exchanges and their effect on surface-water and groundwater quality and quantity.

Contacts: Paul D Capel
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

Groundwater Basics

Groundwater is the largest source of fresh water on Earth - it's kind of a big deal. The USGS monitors, tests, and studies groundwater resources to assure one of our Nation's most precious resources remains viable for future generations.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

Hydraulic Fracturing

Hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking, is the process of injecting water, sand, and/or chemicals into a well to break up underground bedrock to free up oil or gas reserves. The USGS monitors the environmental impact of this practice across the country, from potential earthquakes to degraded groundwater quality.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

Land Subsidence

More than 80 percent of known land subsidence in the U.S. is a consequence of groundwater use, and is an often overlooked environmental consequence of our land and water-use practices. Increasing land development threatens to exacerbate existing land-subsidence problems and initiate new ones. Subsidence detection and mapping done by the USGS is needed to understand and manage our current and...

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 2, 2019
Status: Active

National Water Census: Streamflow

The USGS National Water Census complements the USGS national network of more than 8,000 streamgages by estimating streamflow for ungaged locations throughout the country, by analyzing streamflow records, and by providing tools for analysis of streamgage data to end users. The USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) makes the actual...

Attribution: Water Resources