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Advanced Research

Much of the work of the New England Water Science Center combines traditional hydrology with advanced scientific methods to produce innovative and defensible science. Partnering with researchers from a variety of disciplines leverages our science more than ever. We are always striving to innovate new scientific methods and adapt to constantly changing environmental landscapes.  

Filter Total Items: 15

Research on Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in the New England Water Science Center

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a diverse group of over 4,000 different compounds. Since the 1940s, PFAS have been manufactured and used around the globe, including in the United States. PFAS are resistant to chemical and thermal breakdown and impart stain and water-resistance properties, making them useful for a variety of commercial applications, but also persistent in the...
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Research on Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in the New England Water Science Center

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a diverse group of over 4,000 different compounds. Since the 1940s, PFAS have been manufactured and used around the globe, including in the United States. PFAS are resistant to chemical and thermal breakdown and impart stain and water-resistance properties, making them useful for a variety of commercial applications, but also persistent in the...
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Assessment of Hydrologic Conditions in the Three Bays Watershed in Support of Nutrient Management Activities, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

In 2019 the USGS began a partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD), EPA Region 1 Southeast New England Program for Coastal Watershed Restoration (SNEP), Barnstable Clean Water Coalition (BCWC), and other stakeholders to conduct hydrologic monitoring and assessment in support of multifaceted nutrient-management activities in the Three...
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Assessment of Hydrologic Conditions in the Three Bays Watershed in Support of Nutrient Management Activities, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

In 2019 the USGS began a partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD), EPA Region 1 Southeast New England Program for Coastal Watershed Restoration (SNEP), Barnstable Clean Water Coalition (BCWC), and other stakeholders to conduct hydrologic monitoring and assessment in support of multifaceted nutrient-management activities in the Three...
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Recharge Estimates for Maine: 25-year Average, Range, and Uncertainty, 1990-2015

The USGS Soil-Water-Balance model (SWB) has been used to estimate potential recharge across the State of Maine. The average and range (minimum and maximum) of annual recharge were estimated for the 25-year period from 1990 to 2015. Datasets of estimated recharge and the modeled uncertainty in the recharge estimates are available for download.
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Recharge Estimates for Maine: 25-year Average, Range, and Uncertainty, 1990-2015

The USGS Soil-Water-Balance model (SWB) has been used to estimate potential recharge across the State of Maine. The average and range (minimum and maximum) of annual recharge were estimated for the 25-year period from 1990 to 2015. Datasets of estimated recharge and the modeled uncertainty in the recharge estimates are available for download.
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Assessment of Potential Effects of Water-Supply Withdrawals on Groundwater Levels near the Hyannis Ponds Complex, Barnstable, Massachusetts

The USGS, in cooperation with the Town of Barnstable and MassWildlife, is assessing the potential effects of new water-supply withdrawals on groundwater levels in the Hyannis Ponds Wildlife Management Area on Cape Cod. A groundwater-flow model is being used to simulate the effects of several possible withdrawal and wastewater-return flow scenarios developed by the Town of Barnstable and...
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Assessment of Potential Effects of Water-Supply Withdrawals on Groundwater Levels near the Hyannis Ponds Complex, Barnstable, Massachusetts

The USGS, in cooperation with the Town of Barnstable and MassWildlife, is assessing the potential effects of new water-supply withdrawals on groundwater levels in the Hyannis Ponds Wildlife Management Area on Cape Cod. A groundwater-flow model is being used to simulate the effects of several possible withdrawal and wastewater-return flow scenarios developed by the Town of Barnstable and...
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Hydrologic Site Assessment for Passive Treatment of Groundwater Nitrogen with Permeable Reactive Barriers, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

In 2019 USGS completed a study designed to develop and evaluate a phased site-assessment approach for determining the hydrologic suitability of sites being considered for permeable reactive barrier installation on Cape Cod. The approach provides a template for town officials and other stakeholders to follow when considering PRBs for passive treatment of nitrogen in groundwater on Cape Cod and...
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Hydrologic Site Assessment for Passive Treatment of Groundwater Nitrogen with Permeable Reactive Barriers, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

In 2019 USGS completed a study designed to develop and evaluate a phased site-assessment approach for determining the hydrologic suitability of sites being considered for permeable reactive barrier installation on Cape Cod. The approach provides a template for town officials and other stakeholders to follow when considering PRBs for passive treatment of nitrogen in groundwater on Cape Cod and...
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The Purge Analyzer Tool (PAT) to Assess Optimal Pumping Parameters in the Collection of Representative Groundwater Samples from Wells

The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is developing analytical models to assess in-well groundwater flow conditions during the collection of groundwater samples from wells being pumped. This information can be used to inform groundwater samplers on when and how to collect samples that are most reflective of the targeted aquifer or hydrogeologiic...
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The Purge Analyzer Tool (PAT) to Assess Optimal Pumping Parameters in the Collection of Representative Groundwater Samples from Wells

The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is developing analytical models to assess in-well groundwater flow conditions during the collection of groundwater samples from wells being pumped. This information can be used to inform groundwater samplers on when and how to collect samples that are most reflective of the targeted aquifer or hydrogeologiic...
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Updating a Method to Estimate Probable High Groundwater Levels in Massachusetts

Periodic high groundwater levels are a major cause of septic system-failures, wet basements, and other problems for suburban and rural residents in Massachusetts. To address this issue, a method (commonly referred to as the Frimpter method) was developed in early 1980’s to estimate probable high groundwater levels across the state. The USGS New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the...
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Updating a Method to Estimate Probable High Groundwater Levels in Massachusetts

Periodic high groundwater levels are a major cause of septic system-failures, wet basements, and other problems for suburban and rural residents in Massachusetts. To address this issue, a method (commonly referred to as the Frimpter method) was developed in early 1980’s to estimate probable high groundwater levels across the state. The USGS New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the...
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Preliminary Research into the Causes of Iron Fouling in Water at Roadway Construction Sites

The USGS and the New Hampshire Department of Transportation are conducting preliminary research into the causes of iron fouling in water at roadway construction sites where blasted bedrock is used as on-site fill material.
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Preliminary Research into the Causes of Iron Fouling in Water at Roadway Construction Sites

The USGS and the New Hampshire Department of Transportation are conducting preliminary research into the causes of iron fouling in water at roadway construction sites where blasted bedrock is used as on-site fill material.
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Study to Test a Novel Shallow Well Design that May Provide Contaminant-Free Water Supply to Domestic Well Users in Arsenic-Prone Parts of the United States

The USGS, the University of New Hampshire, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, and the Maine Geological Survey are collaborating on a study of a novel shallow well design that might be able to provide safe drinking water to domestic well users in arsenic-prone parts of the Nation.
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Study to Test a Novel Shallow Well Design that May Provide Contaminant-Free Water Supply to Domestic Well Users in Arsenic-Prone Parts of the United States

The USGS, the University of New Hampshire, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, and the Maine Geological Survey are collaborating on a study of a novel shallow well design that might be able to provide safe drinking water to domestic well users in arsenic-prone parts of the Nation.
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Towards Understanding the Impact of Drought on the Arsenic Hazard for the Private Domestic Well Population in the United States

The USGS and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are examining the potential effects of droughts on the arsenic hazard in private well water across the Nation.
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Towards Understanding the Impact of Drought on the Arsenic Hazard for the Private Domestic Well Population in the United States

The USGS and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are examining the potential effects of droughts on the arsenic hazard in private well water across the Nation.
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Development of Regional Regression Equations to Estimate the Magnitude of Peak Flows for Selected Annual-Exceedance Probabilities in Maine

The flood-frequency characteristics for streamgages and regression equations for estimating flood magnitudes have been published.
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Development of Regional Regression Equations to Estimate the Magnitude of Peak Flows for Selected Annual-Exceedance Probabilities in Maine

The flood-frequency characteristics for streamgages and regression equations for estimating flood magnitudes have been published.
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Development of Regional Regression Equations in Connecticut

Knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of floods is needed for the effective and safe design of bridges, culverts, and other structures. This information is also important for flood-plain planning and management. Periodic examination of flood-frequency characteristics is essential to ensure the best estimates of flood magnitudes for a given annual exceedance probabilities (AEP).
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Development of Regional Regression Equations in Connecticut

Knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of floods is needed for the effective and safe design of bridges, culverts, and other structures. This information is also important for flood-plain planning and management. Periodic examination of flood-frequency characteristics is essential to ensure the best estimates of flood magnitudes for a given annual exceedance probabilities (AEP).
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