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Surface Water

The New England Water Science Center has a long history of monitoring surface-water conditions throughout New England. Continuous and discrete measurements of streamflow and water levels of lakes, reservoirs, and coastal zones provide the foundation for hydrologic assessments, hydraulic and climate-change modeling, and reporting streamflow during floods and droughts.

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Water Cycle Center

The Water Cycle Center is a cooperation between U.S. Geological Survey and academic partners in the Northeast that studies complete water cycles and watersheds, from mountaintops to shorelines, concentrating on freshwater ecosystems. This research advances the understanding of processes that determine water availability and is needed to best address future water resource challenges.
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Water Cycle Center

The Water Cycle Center is a cooperation between U.S. Geological Survey and academic partners in the Northeast that studies complete water cycles and watersheds, from mountaintops to shorelines, concentrating on freshwater ecosystems. This research advances the understanding of processes that determine water availability and is needed to best address future water resource challenges.
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USGS Assessment of Water Resources near Hanscom Air Force Base

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center is expanding its scientific investigation to better understand the water resources at, and in the vicinity of, Hanscom Air Force Base (AFB) and the potential impacts from historical base operations and other sources.
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USGS Assessment of Water Resources near Hanscom Air Force Base

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center is expanding its scientific investigation to better understand the water resources at, and in the vicinity of, Hanscom Air Force Base (AFB) and the potential impacts from historical base operations and other sources.
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Stream Flood Vulnerability Assessment at Acadia National Park

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with Acadia National Park, is assessing the vulnerability of the park’s streams, culverts, and bridges to flood damage and erosion using design flows for selected high streamflow recurrence intervals to inform management decisions on infrastructure upgrades.
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Stream Flood Vulnerability Assessment at Acadia National Park

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with Acadia National Park, is assessing the vulnerability of the park’s streams, culverts, and bridges to flood damage and erosion using design flows for selected high streamflow recurrence intervals to inform management decisions on infrastructure upgrades.
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Water Resources Inventory and Assessment at Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the National Park Service, is compiling and evaluating all known water resources, and documented infrastructure associated with these resources, within the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument and contributing associated watersheds.
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Water Resources Inventory and Assessment at Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the National Park Service, is compiling and evaluating all known water resources, and documented infrastructure associated with these resources, within the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument and contributing associated watersheds.
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A Statewide Hydraulic Modeling Tool for Stream Crossing Projects in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), began a series of studies in 2019 to develop a web-based statewide hydraulic modeling tool to provide preliminary culvert designs for stream-crossing projects in Massachusetts.
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A Statewide Hydraulic Modeling Tool for Stream Crossing Projects in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), began a series of studies in 2019 to develop a web-based statewide hydraulic modeling tool to provide preliminary culvert designs for stream-crossing projects in Massachusetts.
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Regional Regression Equations for Estimating Selected Low-flow Statistics at Ungaged Stream Sites in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Recreation and Conservation, Office of Water Resources, began a study in 2019 to update the regional regression equations for estimating selected low-flow statistics at ungaged sites in Massachusetts.
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Regional Regression Equations for Estimating Selected Low-flow Statistics at Ungaged Stream Sites in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Recreation and Conservation, Office of Water Resources, began a study in 2019 to update the regional regression equations for estimating selected low-flow statistics at ungaged sites in Massachusetts.
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Water Quality Monitoring in the Cambridge Drinking-Water Source Area, Massachusetts

The Cambridge Water Department supplies approximately 13 million gallons per day of drinking water to more than 100,000 customers. Raw water is obtained from a serial system of three primary storage reservoirs—Cambridge Reservoir (also known as the Hobbs Brook Reservoir), Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond Reservoir—in parts of Cambridge, Lexington, Lincoln, Waltham, and Weston, Massachusetts...
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Water Quality Monitoring in the Cambridge Drinking-Water Source Area, Massachusetts

The Cambridge Water Department supplies approximately 13 million gallons per day of drinking water to more than 100,000 customers. Raw water is obtained from a serial system of three primary storage reservoirs—Cambridge Reservoir (also known as the Hobbs Brook Reservoir), Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond Reservoir—in parts of Cambridge, Lexington, Lincoln, Waltham, and Weston, Massachusetts...
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Evaluation of Lakes and Impoundments Drought Index for the Massachusetts Drought Management Plan

Lake and impoundment levels are used for calculating a drought severity index.
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Evaluation of Lakes and Impoundments Drought Index for the Massachusetts Drought Management Plan

Lake and impoundment levels are used for calculating a drought severity index.
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Satellite-based Remote Sensing of River Discharge

The U.S. Geological Survey and NASA are collaborating on a study to develop methods to estimate river flows from satellite observations.
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Satellite-based Remote Sensing of River Discharge

The U.S. Geological Survey and NASA are collaborating on a study to develop methods to estimate river flows from satellite observations.
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Base-Flow Water Quality Sampling in Small Basins Draining to Long Island Sound

During the past 20 years, nitrogen loads to Long Island Sound (LIS) have been substantially reduced in large watersheds affected by municipal wastewater loads.
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Base-Flow Water Quality Sampling in Small Basins Draining to Long Island Sound

During the past 20 years, nitrogen loads to Long Island Sound (LIS) have been substantially reduced in large watersheds affected by municipal wastewater loads.
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Water Quality Sampling in the Tributaries of the Long Island Sound

Coastal estuaries in southern New England and New York show the effects of excess nutrients and coastal eutrophication. These include excessive growth of macroalgae, excessive blooms of phytoplankton, oxygen depletion, hypoxia and deteriorated substrates. State and Federal regulators have responded to these nutrient-caused impairments by requiring more stringent permit limits for National...
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Water Quality Sampling in the Tributaries of the Long Island Sound

Coastal estuaries in southern New England and New York show the effects of excess nutrients and coastal eutrophication. These include excessive growth of macroalgae, excessive blooms of phytoplankton, oxygen depletion, hypoxia and deteriorated substrates. State and Federal regulators have responded to these nutrient-caused impairments by requiring more stringent permit limits for National...
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Flood Documentation and Inundation Mapping of the January and March 2018 Nor’easters in Coastal Massachusetts

2018 Nor’easters in Coastal Massachusetts
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