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Hydrologic Modeling

Numerical and statistical models provide tools to integrate our understanding of hydrologic processes with field data to address scientific and water-management questions. The New England Water Science Center develops models at a range of spatial and temporal scales to assess water availability and water quality and to evaluate the effects of human activities on hydrologic systems. 

Filter Total Items: 13

Environmental streamflows in the United States: historical patterns and predictions

The term environmental streamflows refers to the magnitude, frequency, seasonal timing, duration, and rate of change of streamflows needed to sustain freshwater and estuary ecosystems and human wellbeing. It is important that environmental streamflow assessments by water managers consider changes in climate, land use, and water management; this cannot be done effectively without understanding...
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Environmental streamflows in the United States: historical patterns and predictions

The term environmental streamflows refers to the magnitude, frequency, seasonal timing, duration, and rate of change of streamflows needed to sustain freshwater and estuary ecosystems and human wellbeing. It is important that environmental streamflow assessments by water managers consider changes in climate, land use, and water management; this cannot be done effectively without understanding...
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Transportation-Related Water Projects in New England

The New England Water Science Center collects data and does interpretive studies on hydrology, hydraulics, and water quality in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration and State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) in New England and other states.
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Transportation-Related Water Projects in New England

The New England Water Science Center collects data and does interpretive studies on hydrology, hydraulics, and water quality in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration and State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) in New England and other states.
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Assessment of Hydrologic and Water-Quality Changes in Shallow Groundwater Beneath a Coastal Neighborhood Being Converted from Septic Systems to Municipal Sewers

The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are collaborating on a study to better understand changes to groundwater quality beneath a densely developed coastal neighborhood as it undergoes conversion from onsite wastewater disposal to municipal sewering.
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Assessment of Hydrologic and Water-Quality Changes in Shallow Groundwater Beneath a Coastal Neighborhood Being Converted from Septic Systems to Municipal Sewers

The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are collaborating on a study to better understand changes to groundwater quality beneath a densely developed coastal neighborhood as it undergoes conversion from onsite wastewater disposal to municipal sewering.
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Updating a Method to Estimate Probable High Groundwater Levels in Massachusetts

Periodic high groundwater levels are a major cause of septic system-failures, wet basements, and other problems for suburban and rural residents in Massachusetts. To address this issue, a method (commonly referred to as the Frimpter method) was developed in early 1980’s to estimate probable high groundwater levels across the state. The USGS New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the...
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Updating a Method to Estimate Probable High Groundwater Levels in Massachusetts

Periodic high groundwater levels are a major cause of septic system-failures, wet basements, and other problems for suburban and rural residents in Massachusetts. To address this issue, a method (commonly referred to as the Frimpter method) was developed in early 1980’s to estimate probable high groundwater levels across the state. The USGS New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the...
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Preliminary Research into the Causes of Iron Fouling in Water at Roadway Construction Sites

The USGS and the New Hampshire Department of Transportation are conducting preliminary research into the causes of iron fouling in water at roadway construction sites where blasted bedrock is used as on-site fill material.
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Preliminary Research into the Causes of Iron Fouling in Water at Roadway Construction Sites

The USGS and the New Hampshire Department of Transportation are conducting preliminary research into the causes of iron fouling in water at roadway construction sites where blasted bedrock is used as on-site fill material.
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Towards Understanding the Impact of Drought on the Arsenic Hazard for the Private Domestic Well Population in the United States

The USGS and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are examining the potential effects of droughts on the arsenic hazard in private well water across the Nation.
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Towards Understanding the Impact of Drought on the Arsenic Hazard for the Private Domestic Well Population in the United States

The USGS and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are examining the potential effects of droughts on the arsenic hazard in private well water across the Nation.
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Development of Streamflow Record Extension Equations in New Hampshire

Currently, there are 16 designated rivers in New Hampshire in need of daily mean streamflow estimates for managing instream flows. Many of New Hampshire’s Designated Rivers have current and/or historical streamflow data that may be used to extend an existing streamgages streamflow record in time through record extension techniques. Evaluating the feasibility of record extension techniques to...
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Development of Streamflow Record Extension Equations in New Hampshire

Currently, there are 16 designated rivers in New Hampshire in need of daily mean streamflow estimates for managing instream flows. Many of New Hampshire’s Designated Rivers have current and/or historical streamflow data that may be used to extend an existing streamgages streamflow record in time through record extension techniques. Evaluating the feasibility of record extension techniques to...
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Development of Regional Regression Equations to Estimate the Magnitude of Peak Flows for Selected Annual-Exceedance Probabilities in Maine

The flood-frequency characteristics for streamgages and regression equations for estimating flood magnitudes have been published.
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Development of Regional Regression Equations to Estimate the Magnitude of Peak Flows for Selected Annual-Exceedance Probabilities in Maine

The flood-frequency characteristics for streamgages and regression equations for estimating flood magnitudes have been published.
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Trend Reproduction

As part of the National Water Budget Project, our objective is to quantify how well observed trends are simulated.
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Trend Reproduction

As part of the National Water Budget Project, our objective is to quantify how well observed trends are simulated.
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HBMI PRMS Project

This project will provide a deterministic watershed model of the Meduxnekeag River watershed with a capacity to model water-temperatures capable of simulating future hydrologic and temperature changes based on projected climate estimates.
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HBMI PRMS Project

This project will provide a deterministic watershed model of the Meduxnekeag River watershed with a capacity to model water-temperatures capable of simulating future hydrologic and temperature changes based on projected climate estimates.
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Development of Regional Regression Equations in Connecticut

Knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of floods is needed for the effective and safe design of bridges, culverts, and other structures. This information is also important for flood-plain planning and management. Periodic examination of flood-frequency characteristics is essential to ensure the best estimates of flood magnitudes for a given annual exceedance probabilities (AEP).
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Development of Regional Regression Equations in Connecticut

Knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of floods is needed for the effective and safe design of bridges, culverts, and other structures. This information is also important for flood-plain planning and management. Periodic examination of flood-frequency characteristics is essential to ensure the best estimates of flood magnitudes for a given annual exceedance probabilities (AEP).
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SELDM: Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model - Project page

Note: SELDM is now on version 1.1.0.
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