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Desert marigold (Baileya multiradiata) blooming in a monitoring quadrat at a RestoreNet site
Desert marigold (Baileya multiradiata) blooming in a monitoring quadrat at a RestoreNet site
Desert marigold (Baileya multiradiata) blooming in a monitoring quadrat at a RestoreNet site
Desert marigold (Baileya multiradiata) blooming in a monitoring quadrat at a RestoreNet site

Desert marigold (Baileya multiradiata) blooming in a monitoring quadrat at a RestoreNet site in Northern Arizona. Photo by Laura Shriver (USGS).

Claudia Dimartini holds a long camelthorn rhizomes exposed in a wash at Wupatki National Monument
Long camelthorn rhizomes exposed in a wash at Wupatki National Monument
Long camelthorn rhizomes exposed in a wash at Wupatki National Monument
Long camelthorn rhizomes exposed in a wash at Wupatki National Monument

USGS Biological Science Technician Claudia Dimartini poses with a long camelthorn (Alhagi maurorum) rhizome (underground root structure from which new plants can propagate that was exposed in a wash at the Deadman Wash Confluence Area. Photo by Laura Shriver (USGS).

USGS Biological Science Technician Claudia Dimartini poses with a long camelthorn (Alhagi maurorum) rhizome (underground root structure from which new plants can propagate that was exposed in a wash at the Deadman Wash Confluence Area. Photo by Laura Shriver (USGS).

postfire debris flows
Postfire debris flows
Postfire debris flows
Postfire debris flows

Fast-moving, highly destructive debris flows triggered by intense rainfall are one of the most dangerous post-fire hazards. The risk of floods and debris flows after fires increases due to vegetation loss and soil exposure. Cases of sudden and deadly debris flow are well documented along the western United States, particularly in Southern California.

Fast-moving, highly destructive debris flows triggered by intense rainfall are one of the most dangerous post-fire hazards. The risk of floods and debris flows after fires increases due to vegetation loss and soil exposure. Cases of sudden and deadly debris flow are well documented along the western United States, particularly in Southern California.

wildfire temperatures
How Hot Are Wildfires?
How Hot Are Wildfires?
How Hot Are Wildfires?

How hot do wildfires get? 

  • 570 F degrees - TEMPERATURE AT WHICH WOOD WILL BURST INTO FLAMES
  • 2,200 F degrees - TEMPERATURE WILDFIRES COULD REACH IN EXTREME CONDITIONS

How hot do wildfires get? 

  • 570 F degrees - TEMPERATURE AT WHICH WOOD WILL BURST INTO FLAMES
  • 2,200 F degrees - TEMPERATURE WILDFIRES COULD REACH IN EXTREME CONDITIONS
Map of North America showing locations where chronic wasting disease has been detected.
Distribution of Chronic Wasting Disease in North America
Distribution of Chronic Wasting Disease in North America
Distribution of Chronic Wasting Disease in North America

Distribution of Chronic Wasting Disease in North America, updated June 08, 2024.

Photomicrographs from little brown bats, one with square-eared anomaly.
Photomicrographs from little brown bats, one with square-eared anomaly, found dead in Montana, USA.
Photomicrographs from little brown bats, one with square-eared anomaly, found dead in Montana, USA.
Photomicrographs from little brown bats, one with square-eared anomaly, found dead in Montana, USA.

Photomicrographs from an unaffected Little Brown Bat (M. lucifugus; A-B) and Little Brown Bat found dead in Montana, USA with the square-eared anomaly (C-E). Periodic Acid Schiff-Hematoxylin. (A) Pinna of an unaffected Little Brown Bat showing the epidermis (e and arrow), dermis (d) and central elastic cartilage plate (c).

Photomicrographs from an unaffected Little Brown Bat (M. lucifugus; A-B) and Little Brown Bat found dead in Montana, USA with the square-eared anomaly (C-E). Periodic Acid Schiff-Hematoxylin. (A) Pinna of an unaffected Little Brown Bat showing the epidermis (e and arrow), dermis (d) and central elastic cartilage plate (c).

Incorporating cattle into restoration treatments at a Northern Arizona RestoreNet site
Incorporating cattle into restoration treatments at a Northern Arizona RestoreNet site
Incorporating cattle into restoration treatments at a Northern Arizona RestoreNet site
Incorporating cattle into restoration treatments at a Northern Arizona RestoreNet site

Cattle inside a grazing enclosure at the Bar T Bar Ranch RestoreNet site in Northern Arizona.

RAMPS employees and partners pose in front of a cattle grazing enclosure at a RestoreNet site
RAMPS employees and partners pose in front of a cattle grazing enclosure at a RestoreNet site
RAMPS employees and partners pose in front of a cattle grazing enclosure at a RestoreNet site
RAMPS employees and partners pose in front of a cattle grazing enclosure at a RestoreNet site

From left to right: RAMPS Ecologist Seth Munson, RAMPS Coordinator Laura Shriver, RAMPS Biologist Sarah Costanzo, NAU postdoctoral researcher Collin VanBuren, and Diablo Trust Program Manager Corinne LaViolette. Photo by Seth Munson (USGS).

From left to right: RAMPS Ecologist Seth Munson, RAMPS Coordinator Laura Shriver, RAMPS Biologist Sarah Costanzo, NAU postdoctoral researcher Collin VanBuren, and Diablo Trust Program Manager Corinne LaViolette. Photo by Seth Munson (USGS).

Newly installed RestoreNet treatments including pits + seedballs + live topsoil and live topsoil + direct seeding
Newly installed RestoreNet treatments including pits + seedballs + live topsoil and live topsoil + direct seeding
Newly installed RestoreNet treatments including pits + seedballs + live topsoil and live topsoil + direct seeding
Newly installed RestoreNet treatments including pits + seedballs + live topsoil and live topsoil + direct seeding

Newly installed RestoreNet Version 2.0 treatment plots at Bar T Bar Ranch in Northern Arizona. Left: a plot that received pitting + seedballs + live topsoil inoculum (in the seedballs), Right: a plot that received live topsoil inoculum (spread across the plot) and direct seeding.

Newly installed RestoreNet Version 2.0 treatment plots at Bar T Bar Ranch in Northern Arizona. Left: a plot that received pitting + seedballs + live topsoil inoculum (in the seedballs), Right: a plot that received live topsoil inoculum (spread across the plot) and direct seeding.

USGS and USFWS logos with title "An Orchestra of Conservation for the Melodies of Hakalau Forest" featured on an image of a red apapane bird against a blue sky background
An Orchestra of Conservation for the Melodies of Hakalau Forest.PNG
An Orchestra of Conservation for the Melodies of Hakalau Forest.PNG
An Orchestra of Conservation for the Melodies of Hakalau Forest.PNG

USGS and USFWS logos with title "An Orchestra of Conservation for the Melodies of Hakalau Forest" featured on an image of a red apapane bird against a blue sky background

USGS and USFWS logos with title "An Orchestra of Conservation for the Melodies of Hakalau Forest" featured on an image of a red apapane bird against a blue sky background

View of pool 13 from the vegetated shore on a clear, sunny day
Pool 13 study area from Eagle Point Park
Pool 13 study area from Eagle Point Park
Pool 13 study area from Eagle Point Park

A view of the study area of Pool 13 of the Upper Mississippi River on a calm day from Eagle Point Park in Clinton, IA.

A view of the study area of Pool 13 of the Upper Mississippi River on a calm day from Eagle Point Park in Clinton, IA.

Photos showing discard on raccoon eye, crusty nasal planum, and lesions in airway.
Photographs and photomicrographs from a Common Raccoon (Procyon lotor) found dead in Wisconsin
Photographs and photomicrographs from a Common Raccoon (Procyon lotor) found dead in Wisconsin
Photographs and photomicrographs from a Common Raccoon (Procyon lotor) found dead in Wisconsin

Photographs and photomicrographs from a Common Raccoon (Procyon lotor) found dead in Wisconsin, USA. (A) There is green-gray mucoid discharge around the eyes and the nasal planum is crusty (arrows).

Photographs and photomicrographs from a Common Raccoon (Procyon lotor) found dead in Wisconsin, USA. (A) There is green-gray mucoid discharge around the eyes and the nasal planum is crusty (arrows).

Hawai‘i ‘ākepa sits in tropical forested area
Hawai‘i ‘ākepa sits in tropical forested area
Hawai‘i ‘ākepa sits in tropical forested area
Hawai‘i ‘ākepa sits in tropical forested area

Bright orange native Hawai‘i ‘ākepa sits in lush green tropical forested area in Hawai'i. 

Volunteers lean over to plant trees in grassy area of a forest in Hawai'i
Volunteers lean over to plant trees in grassy area of a forest in Hawai'i
Volunteers lean over to plant trees in grassy area of a forest in Hawai'i
Volunteers lean over to plant trees in grassy area of a forest in Hawai'i

Volunteers lean over to plant trees in grassy area of a forest in Hawai'i. These trees provide crucial habitat for native birds within the refuge.

Volunteers lean over to plant trees in grassy area of a forest in Hawai'i. These trees provide crucial habitat for native birds within the refuge.

Volunteers and scientists stand amidst tall trees in a Hawaiian forest
Volunteers and scientists stand amidst tall trees in a Hawaiian forest
Volunteers and scientists stand amidst tall trees in a Hawaiian forest
Volunteers and scientists stand amidst tall trees in a Hawaiian forest

Volunteers and scientists stand amidst tall trees in a Hawaiian forest where habitat restoration is taking place for native birds.

A red 'apanane bird sits on shrubbery against a bright blue sky.
'apanane
'apanane
'apanane

A red, native 'apanane bird sits on pink and white shrubbery against a bright blue sky in Hawaii.

A red, native 'apanane bird sits on pink and white shrubbery against a bright blue sky in Hawaii.

scientist smiling with blond curly hair, glasses, wearing an orange jacket and yellow vest, near water , mountains and a rainbow
Christina Murphy
Christina Murphy
Christina Murphy

Christina Murphy is the Assistant Unit Leader, Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Originally from Oregon, Christina received her MSc from the University of Girona, Spain and her PhD from Oregon State University. She was a post-doctoral fellow at Oregon State University before joining the Maine Unit in late 2020.

Christina Murphy is the Assistant Unit Leader, Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Originally from Oregon, Christina received her MSc from the University of Girona, Spain and her PhD from Oregon State University. She was a post-doctoral fellow at Oregon State University before joining the Maine Unit in late 2020.

scientist smiling, with short blond/red hair, wearing a blue shirt
Kevin Pope
Kevin Pope
Kevin Pope

Kevin earned a B.S. from Texas A&M University, an M.S. from Auburn University, and a Ph.D. from South Dakota State University. Prior to joining the Nebraska Unit, he was a tenured Associate Professor at Texas Tech University.

Kevin earned a B.S. from Texas A&M University, an M.S. from Auburn University, and a Ph.D. from South Dakota State University. Prior to joining the Nebraska Unit, he was a tenured Associate Professor at Texas Tech University.

scientist smiling, wearing a gray vest, blue shirt, holding a fish on a boat with a dog
Michael Quist
Michael Quist
Michael Quist

Mike received his BS in Fishery Resources from the University of Idaho, MS in Biology from Kansas State University, and a PhD in Biology from Kansas State University.

Mike received his BS in Fishery Resources from the University of Idaho, MS in Biology from Kansas State University, and a PhD in Biology from Kansas State University.

GIF with maps showing chronic wasting disease distribution in North America prior to 2000 and yearly from 2004-2023.
Chronic wasting disease: change in documented distribution in North America 2000-2023
Chronic wasting disease: change in documented distribution in North America 2000-2023
Chronic wasting disease: change in documented distribution in North America 2000-2023

Animated GIF showing changes in distribution of chronic wasting disease in North America from 2000-2023 as documented at the end of each year. Individual files of yearly maps are available at https://doi.org/10.5066/P9HQKKFO.

Animated GIF showing changes in distribution of chronic wasting disease in North America from 2000-2023 as documented at the end of each year. Individual files of yearly maps are available at https://doi.org/10.5066/P9HQKKFO.

RAMPS Biologist rides a bike designed to create seedballs (mixes of seed, clay, and other materials) for restoration
RAMPS Biologist rides a seedball bike to make seedballs for RestoreNet restoration
RAMPS Biologist rides a seedball bike to make seedballs for RestoreNet restoration
RAMPS Biologist rides a seedball bike to make seedballs for RestoreNet restoration

RAMPS Biologist Sarah Costanzo rides a seedball bike designed to create seedballs (mixes of seed, clay, and other materials) for RestoreNet restoration

RAMPS Biologist Sarah Costanzo rides a seedball bike designed to create seedballs (mixes of seed, clay, and other materials) for RestoreNet restoration