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Environmental Health Featured Science Activities

Our science activities are summarized in a series of feature articles that highlight recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) environmental health science activities. They are short summaries of peer-reviewed journal articles and USGS reports co-authored by our specialized teams of scientists.
 

Filter Total Items: 224

Human-Related Compounds in Water Sources in the Grand Canyon Help Identify Water Flow Pathways and Highlight Potential Water Quality Changes

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists investigated the movement of human-generated chemicals, such as pharmaceuticals and per- and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS), in groundwater along the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. This research led to a better understanding of the movement of wastewater into groundwater, of complex underground flow patterns, and of chemicals present in springs near...
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Human-Related Compounds in Water Sources in the Grand Canyon Help Identify Water Flow Pathways and Highlight Potential Water Quality Changes

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists investigated the movement of human-generated chemicals, such as pharmaceuticals and per- and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS), in groundwater along the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. This research led to a better understanding of the movement of wastewater into groundwater, of complex underground flow patterns, and of chemicals present in springs near...
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6PPD-Quinone

6PPD-Q is a compound used to make tires more durable and is also linked to toxicity for Coho Salmon and other aquatic species.
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Increased Mercury, Reduced Insect Diversity, and Food Web impacts from Historical Mercury Mining

U.S. Geological Survey scientists are seeking to understand the impacts of mercury mining on headwater streams, organisms, and food webs, focused on potential effects from historical mining in central Idaho. Mercury associated with mine waste can leave a legacy of contamination that continues to impact stream health in culturally and ecologically important headwater streams after mining activities...
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Increased Mercury, Reduced Insect Diversity, and Food Web impacts from Historical Mercury Mining

U.S. Geological Survey scientists are seeking to understand the impacts of mercury mining on headwater streams, organisms, and food webs, focused on potential effects from historical mining in central Idaho. Mercury associated with mine waste can leave a legacy of contamination that continues to impact stream health in culturally and ecologically important headwater streams after mining activities...
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Toxin Producing Algae Across U.S. Landscapes—Are They Gaining a Foothold?

There are still many unknowns related to the occurrence and potential range of various types of algae in inland waters. To fill some of these gaps, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently published a review and synthesis of toxic algae in inland waters of the conterminous United States .
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Toxin Producing Algae Across U.S. Landscapes—Are They Gaining a Foothold?

There are still many unknowns related to the occurrence and potential range of various types of algae in inland waters. To fill some of these gaps, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently published a review and synthesis of toxic algae in inland waters of the conterminous United States .
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USGS Scientists Develop an Interactive Mapping Tool to Visualize PFAS in Tap Water

A new interactive dashboard is available to visualize PFAS measurements for 716 tap water samples collected at select sites across the nation between 2016 and 2021 from private and public supplies.
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USGS Scientists Develop an Interactive Mapping Tool to Visualize PFAS in Tap Water

A new interactive dashboard is available to visualize PFAS measurements for 716 tap water samples collected at select sites across the nation between 2016 and 2021 from private and public supplies.
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A Farewell but not a Goodbye to a Civil Servant that Never Wavered on her Dedication to the Environment

Kathy Lee, a Deputy Program Coordinator for the Toxic Substances Hydrology Program within the Environmental Health Program, retired at the end of July. Her work with NAWQA as an ecologist, author of the GeoHealth Newsletter, archivist for the programs bibliography, mentor and resource will make a lasting impression in the Environmental Health community.
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A Farewell but not a Goodbye to a Civil Servant that Never Wavered on her Dedication to the Environment

Kathy Lee, a Deputy Program Coordinator for the Toxic Substances Hydrology Program within the Environmental Health Program, retired at the end of July. Her work with NAWQA as an ecologist, author of the GeoHealth Newsletter, archivist for the programs bibliography, mentor and resource will make a lasting impression in the Environmental Health community.
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Unique Approach to Measure Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances Uptake in Fish, Mussels, and Passive Samplers

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) uptake and bioconcentration by fish and mussels ─ housed in mobile laboratories at a legacy fire-training area contaminated by aqueous film-forming foams ─ varied by species, sex, and compound. PFAS in passive samplers deployed at the same time mimicked uptake by fish but not mussels indicating that passive samplers might prove useful as screening tools...
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Unique Approach to Measure Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances Uptake in Fish, Mussels, and Passive Samplers

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) uptake and bioconcentration by fish and mussels ─ housed in mobile laboratories at a legacy fire-training area contaminated by aqueous film-forming foams ─ varied by species, sex, and compound. PFAS in passive samplers deployed at the same time mimicked uptake by fish but not mussels indicating that passive samplers might prove useful as screening tools...
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Organic Contaminants in Reuse Waters and Transport Following Land Application

Potential reuse waters contained unique mixtures of organic contaminants with the greatest number detected in treated municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent, followed by urban stormwater, and agricultural runoff . This study provided information for decisions on reuse strategies to support freshwater supplies.
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Organic Contaminants in Reuse Waters and Transport Following Land Application

Potential reuse waters contained unique mixtures of organic contaminants with the greatest number detected in treated municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent, followed by urban stormwater, and agricultural runoff . This study provided information for decisions on reuse strategies to support freshwater supplies.
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Collaborative Science Provides Understanding of Contaminants in Bottled Water-an Increasingly Common Alternate Drinking Water Source

U.S. Geological Survey researchers and public health experts collaborated to determine what contaminants occur in bottled water, which is an increasingly common alternate drinking water source, to broaden their understanding of human exposure to contaminants in drinking water supply chains. Bottled water, like public-supply and private-well tap water supply chains, contained multiple organic...
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Collaborative Science Provides Understanding of Contaminants in Bottled Water-an Increasingly Common Alternate Drinking Water Source

U.S. Geological Survey researchers and public health experts collaborated to determine what contaminants occur in bottled water, which is an increasingly common alternate drinking water source, to broaden their understanding of human exposure to contaminants in drinking water supply chains. Bottled water, like public-supply and private-well tap water supply chains, contained multiple organic...
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Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) Measurements in Tampa Bay Fish and Sediments Provide an Understanding of Potential Human Exposure

Scientists provide an understanding of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) levels in sediments and the edible portions of fish within Florida’s Tampa Bay in a pilot study designed to understand the potential for human exposure and health risks through fish consumption.
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Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) Measurements in Tampa Bay Fish and Sediments Provide an Understanding of Potential Human Exposure

Scientists provide an understanding of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) levels in sediments and the edible portions of fish within Florida’s Tampa Bay in a pilot study designed to understand the potential for human exposure and health risks through fish consumption.
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Coproduced Science Linking Environmental and Public-Health Data to Evaluate Drinking Water Arsenic Exposure on Birth Outcomes

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists teamed up with public-health epidemiologists to probe for associations between arsenic in drinking water and human-birth outcomes. They reported a modest inverse relation between birth weight and arsenic exposure. Findings indicate that future research efforts using individual-level exposure data such as measured arsenic concentrations in tap water could...
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Coproduced Science Linking Environmental and Public-Health Data to Evaluate Drinking Water Arsenic Exposure on Birth Outcomes

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists teamed up with public-health epidemiologists to probe for associations between arsenic in drinking water and human-birth outcomes. They reported a modest inverse relation between birth weight and arsenic exposure. Findings indicate that future research efforts using individual-level exposure data such as measured arsenic concentrations in tap water could...
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Gratitude for a Dedicated Civil Servant who Tirelessly Promoted Environmental Health Science

Mike Focazio, the Environmental Health Program Coordinator, editor of the GeoHEALTH-USGS Newsletter, and research scientist retired from the USGS at the end of November. Throughout his 33-year career, Mike’s principle-based leadership focusing on transparency, accountability, and scientific integrity has carried environmental health science forward at USGS and for the Nation.
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Gratitude for a Dedicated Civil Servant who Tirelessly Promoted Environmental Health Science

Mike Focazio, the Environmental Health Program Coordinator, editor of the GeoHEALTH-USGS Newsletter, and research scientist retired from the USGS at the end of November. Throughout his 33-year career, Mike’s principle-based leadership focusing on transparency, accountability, and scientific integrity has carried environmental health science forward at USGS and for the Nation.
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