Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center

Scientists from the Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center capitalize on their diverse expertise to answer scientific questions shaped by the environments of the western United States. We collaborate with each other and with partners to provide rigorous, objective, and timely information and guidance to support sound management, conservation, and restoration of the Nation's natural resource

News

Dragonflies Reveal Surprising Insights into Mercury Pollution

Dragonflies Reveal Surprising Insights into Mercury Pollution

Wind Power and Conservation in Kazakhstan and Central Asia

Wind Power and Conservation in Kazakhstan and Central Asia

Trout, beavers, drought, and a “precious” frog

Trout, beavers, drought, and a “precious” frog

Publications

Restoring Pacific Lamprey in the Umpqua River Basin of Oregon: A workshop summary

The Umpqua River Basin in southwestern Oregon (Figure 1) is part of the lands inhabited by the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians and an area of active co-management authority. This Basin supports a unique fish fauna, including important populations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and steelhead (O. mykiss), and other native fishes that are endemic to the region (Mims et al. 2018). Amo
Authors
Jason B. Dunham, Krista Jones, Kelly C. Coates, Travis Mackie

Carbon isotope trends across a century of herbarium specimens suggest CO2 fertilization of C4 grasses.

Increasing atmospheric CO2 is changing the dynamics of tropical savanna vegetation. C3 trees and grasses are known to experience CO2 fertilization, whereas responses to CO2 by C4 grasses are more ambiguous.Here, we sample stable carbon isotope trends in herbarium collections of South African C4 and C3 grasses to reconstruct 13C discrimination.We found that C3 grasses showed no trends in 13C discri
Authors
Isa del Toro, Madelon Florence Case, Allison Karp, Jasper Slingsby, A. Carla Staver

Structural heterogeneity predicts ecological resistance and resilience to wildfire in arid shrublands

ContextDynamic feedbacks between physical structure and ecological function drive ecosystem productivity, resilience, and biodiversity maintenance. Detailed maps of canopy structure enable comprehensive evaluations of structure–function relationships. However, these relationships are scale-dependent, and identifying relevant spatial scales to link structure to function remains challenging.Objectiv
Authors
Andrii Zaiats, Megan E Cattau, David Pilliod, Rongsong Liu, Patricia Kaye T. Dumandan, Ahmad Hojatimalekshah, Donna M. Delparte, Trevor Caughlin

Science

Mechanisms and Outcomes of Science Facilitation

USGS researchers are studying how science facilitation can help diverse and interdisciplinary teams of scientists collaborate effectively and develop a common scientific understanding of complex challenges.
link

Mechanisms and Outcomes of Science Facilitation

USGS researchers are studying how science facilitation can help diverse and interdisciplinary teams of scientists collaborate effectively and develop a common scientific understanding of complex challenges.
Learn More

The Dragonfly Mercury Project

The Dragonfly Mercury Project measures mercury concentrations in dragonfly larvae from U.S. National Parks and other protected places across the country. This information helps scientists and resource managers, and policymakers assess potential environmental health risks due to mercury, track patterns over time, and assess the efficacy of mercury mitigation efforts. Explore this website to learn...
link

The Dragonfly Mercury Project

The Dragonfly Mercury Project measures mercury concentrations in dragonfly larvae from U.S. National Parks and other protected places across the country. This information helps scientists and resource managers, and policymakers assess potential environmental health risks due to mercury, track patterns over time, and assess the efficacy of mercury mitigation efforts. Explore this website to learn...
Learn More

The Impact of Climate-Driven Phenological Shifts on Cheatgrass in Western North America

Climate change-induced warming can alter plant phenology and disrupt ecosystems like the sagebrush steppe in western North America. The invasive annual grass cheatgrass can thrive under these altered conditions, exacerbating wildfires and threatening wildlife habitat, carbon storage, and other important ecosystem services. We are studying how different densities of cheatgrass respond to increased...
link

The Impact of Climate-Driven Phenological Shifts on Cheatgrass in Western North America

Climate change-induced warming can alter plant phenology and disrupt ecosystems like the sagebrush steppe in western North America. The invasive annual grass cheatgrass can thrive under these altered conditions, exacerbating wildfires and threatening wildlife habitat, carbon storage, and other important ecosystem services. We are studying how different densities of cheatgrass respond to increased...
Learn More