Water Resources

Measuring and Monitoring Water

Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF)

Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF)

The HIF provides quality hydrologic equipment and instrumentation

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Streamgaging Basics

Streamgaging Basics

The USGS has a nationwide network of over 8,500 sites that measure streamflow and water levels.

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Filter Total Items: 160
Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Mining Water Use

Mining water use is water used for the extraction of minerals that may be in the form of solids, such as coal, iron, sand, and gravel; liquids, such as crude petroleum; and gases, such as natural gas. The category includes quarrying, milling of mined materials, injection of water for secondary oil recovery or for unconventional oil and gas recovery (such as hydraulic fracturing), and other...

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Livestock Water Use

Livestock water use is water associated with livestock watering, feedlots, dairy operations, and other on-farm needs. Livestock includes dairy cows and heifers, beef cattle and calves, sheep and lambs, goats, hogs and pigs, horses, and poultry. Other livestock water uses include cooling of facilities for the animals and products, dairy sanitation and wash down of facilities, animal waste-...

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Aquaculture Water Use

Aquaculture water use is water associated with raising organisms that live in water—such as finfish and shellfish—for food, restoration, conservation, or sport. Aquaculture production occurs under controlled feeding, sanitation, and harvesting procedures primarily in ponds, flowthrough raceways, and, to a lesser extent, cages, net pens, and closed-recirculation tanks.

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Pesticides and Water Quality

Pesticides are chemicals designed to kill pests, including insects (insecticides), weeds (herbicides), and fungi (fungicides). The USGS assesses the occurrence and behavior of pesticides in streams, lakes, and groundwater and the potential for pesticides to contaminate our drinking-water supplies or harm aquatic ecosystems.

Contacts: Lisa Nowell
Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Pathogens and Other Microorganisms

The USGS works to monitor and assess how disease-causing pathogens enter our water and help those who manage drinking and wastewater facilities prevent and treat these viruses, bacteria, algal toxins, and other microorganisms.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Corrosivity

Corrosivity describes how aggressive water is at corroding pipes and fixtures. Corrosive water can cause lead and copper in pipes to leach into drinking water and can eventually cause leaks in plumbing.  Surface water and groundwater, both sources of drinking water, can potentially be corrosive.

Contacts: Ken Belitz
Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Public Supply Wells

Are you among the more than 100 million people in the U.S. who relies on a public-supply well for your drinking water? Although the quality of finished drinking water from public water systems is regulated by the EPA, long-term protection and management of the raw groundwater tapped by public-supply wells requires an understanding of the occurrence of contaminants in this invisible, vital...

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Domestic (Private) Supply Wells

More than 43 million people—about 15 percent of the U.S. population—rely on domestic (private) wells as their source of drinking water. The quality and safety of water from domestic wells are not regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act or, in most cases, by state laws. Instead, individual homeowners are responsible for maintaining their domestic well systems and for monitoring water...

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

Water-Quality Benchmarks for Contaminants

How does the water quality measure up?  It all depends on what the water will be used for and what contaminants are of interest.  Water-quality benchmarks are designed to protect drinking water, recreation, aquatic life, and wildlife.  Here you’ll find links to some of the most widely used sets of water, sediment, and fish tissue benchmarks and general guidance about their interpretation.

Contacts: Lisa Nowell
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: February 28, 2019
Status: Active

Linking Selenium Sources to Ecosystems: Local and Global Perspectives

The sources, biogeochemistry, and ecotoxicology of selenium (Se) combine to produce a widespread potential for ecological risk such as deformities in birds and fish. Linking the understanding of source characteristics to a mechanistic, biodynamic dietary model of Se exposure on an ecosystem-scale improves the prediction of Se effects and its potential remediation.

Contacts: Theresa Presser, Joseph P. Skorupa
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: February 28, 2019
Status: Active

National Water Census: Regional Groundwater Availability Studies

The National Water Census includes regional analysis of groundwater availability, enabling information to be integrated and consistent so the resource can be analyzed and understood on an aquifer–wide scale.  The NWC also seeks to increase capacity to integrate groundwater and surface water into watershed-level assessments of water availability.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: February 28, 2019
Status: Active

Flood Inundation Mapping Toolbox

The FIM Toolbox contains comprehensive information on the Flood Inundation Mapping program, including how to develop a flood inundation map library. Resources include process documents, scientific and technical requirements, forms and templates, outreach and educational materials, and contact information. The FIM Toolbox is updated as new resources become available.

Attribution: Water Resources